margaret thatcher

During the Labour Party conference last month, I raised the question of whether some of the party's leading women, such as
This year's Man Booker Prize has been plagued by accusations of 'dumbing down', or, as the illiterate goons hauled off the street to act as judges might put it, 'dummin' daaan'.
David Cameron is one of life's natural optimists. He wants the British people to "summon the appetite to fight for a better future". If material economic gains will only slowly fill the nation's bellies, Mr Cameron will need to offer something alternatively holistic to feed the nation's soul.
Yesterday afternoon, Ed Miliband came of age as Labour leader. His second major speech to annual conference was a bold, radical assessment of the modern era, and of why people have felt increasingly disenfranchised and powerless over recent decades.
THERE will be a great deal of suspicion generated by the government's decision to appeal against an order to make public
The media still seems baffled that prim and proper England would be almost brought to its knees by what the London Daily Mail newspaper referred to as "nihilistic and feral teenagers" rioters.
Trade unions protect workers' labour in times of doubt and desperation. In the print-media, a union can offset the excessive
It is the height of folly not to review Defence spending now that we are committed to yet another major operation. Margaret Thatcher in 1982 realised that she would cease to be Prime Minister if the Falklands issue went wrong.
It is the height of folly not to review Defence spending now that we are committed to yet another major operation.
The collapse of the banking system and the recent phone-hacking scandal have led some to question the wisdom of market forces