Mary and Martha

2013 has been a year of tremendous progress for the malaria campaign globally and locally. We are delighted with the UK cross party support for the malaria campaign. Parliamentarians can see the value of sustaining its prosecution, and the public appear to share our conviction that it is unacceptable in the twenty first century for children to die for want of treatment costing less than £1...
We were with Richard Curtis for a screening of his latest film Mary and Martha. It's a story about two mothers who have nothing in common except their shared loss of their sons through malaria. I was there because I share their story, I lost my son Harry to malaria and my own experience is reflected in the character of Martha.
On 12 March I found myself, once again, transported from housewife and Inclusion Officer to Special Ambassador for Malaria No More UK. The Upper School where I work are very accommodating when I need a day off to be an Ambassador. They understand just what it means to me to be able to tell my late son, Harry's story and add my voice to the battle to help end deaths from malaria.
When Comic Relief invited me to Uganda for Red Nose Day to meet families affected by malaria, I was worried and scared in equal measures. Worried about how I would cope with hearing from parents who have lost children to this deadly disease, and scared that I too could get bitten by a malaria infected mosquito and fall sick.
This week, I went to a private screening of the new Richard Curtis film Mary and Martha at The Electric Cinema in Portobello Road, London. You are asking yourself, why were you, Jo Yirrell there? Well, would you believe, I was part of the inspiration for Richard as he wrote the film.
Ipsos MORI recently released a poll which showed that three quarters (76%) of those surveyed in Britain say they know 'not very much' or 'nothing at all' about the development aid given by the UK to poorer countries.