maternal mortality

We are knee-deep in bad news and I've lost count of the number of conversations I have had with people anxious about the future, particularly for women and girls, but I am staying hopeful. And the reason: two plasters.
In order to have a socially progressive society, we need to empower women to take charge of their own health through education and open discussion. Throwaway remarks devaluing women's health issues should be snuffed out straight away since this is a dangerous game for politicians.
More than ever we require an official set of guidelines so that pregnant women with mental health issues are not given conflicting medical opinions which have the potential to cause serious harm.
For over 10 years, WBFA and I have intervened to assist with medical bills through our various community programmes like the TMB and IMedF. However, this model is ultimately unsustainable.
Left untreated, both conditions are likely to result in the deaths of both mum and baby. The only cure is for the baby to be born. My partner and I were both utterly devastated - we knew the chances of our baby's survival at that stage were slim.
By investing to make contraception available to every woman who wants it, improving access to safe abortion where it's legal and making sure that medical care is readily available when things go wrong we can make a real difference. It's not rocket science - even for someone still relatively new to the development sector like me.
Women around the world are still facing some of the worst discrimination imaginable. From child marriage to female genital mutilation and inexcusably high rates of maternal mortality, the list goes on. As we approach International Women's Day, it doesn't seem like there is much to celebrate.
Sierra Leone should be one of the most prosperous countries in West Africa, with its diamonds, iron ore and bauxite reserves. Yet, the vast majority of its people live in grinding poverty, and the country has the fourth highest maternal mortality rate in the world. On health, though, it is making progress.
When Agnes Lunkembesa gave birth to her ninth child, she decided enough was enough. But although she knew perfectly well how babies were made, she had no idea how to stop them being made.
People around the world know that education is the key to a better life. Voters from over 190 countries who responded to the United Nations My World survey said providing a good education for all was the best way to build a better world. There's a huge gap between that goal and reality, however: 250million children are still being denied a chance to learn the basics.