menstrual hygiene day

By learning about the human body and menstruation in isolation, a barrier was established between boys and girls.
I'm going to be honest and admit that I'm suffering from an acute case of voter apathy. Disappointed by the result of the EU referendum, I'm less than enthused by the prospect of the snap general election and haven't paid much heed to the headlines nor the leaflets shoved through my door.
I'm willing to bet that if you ask most women, they will be able to recount the story of the first time they got their period. It's a moment that sticks with you no matter how prepared you are, particularly because for many girls around the world, it is punctuated by fear, anxiety, and embarrassment.
This Menstrual Hygiene Day we want to get everyone talking about why #menstruationmatters. And you can help! Share this blog on Twitter and Facebook to start the conversation and help break the taboos about periods that are holding girls back.
In low income countries, many women and girls don't have access to affordable and hygienic feminine products; instead they are forced to use improvised materials like rags or leaves, which are not only uncomfortable but can also lead to infection or embarrassing leaks.
On top of ensuring women have the privacy they need by supplying tents and building temporary shelters for each family affected by the earthquake, ActionAid is providing women in affected communities in Nepal with vital sanitary kits. We've given out 10,000 already.
It's time to break the silence. Here in the UK, menstruation may be an annoyance. It may even be painful. But for many girls and women around the world, it carries much more serious consequences.