mHealth

I am a hypnotist and it's interesting how many people I meet feel that they are out of control of parts of their lives. There's one thing that simply comes back again and again and is almost impossible for them to change in their everyday lives.
I know we can make a significant impact on this situation. I've seen how a little support can help people make small but very significant changes to their lives and that's why I'm so excited that our Newcastle app - dubbed Changing Health - is now being prescribed by GPs in large parts of the country. We are about to give people the key to unlock their healthy future nationwide, and I can't wait to see it happen.
The economic benefits of rural internet use are far from realised in Africa. New technology is lowering the costs of rural coverage.
For women living in rural locations in Ghana, portable ultrasounds may be a useful tool in preventing pregnancy complications
Wearable devices are evolving rapidly, and with increased battery life and a prettier feel and look (rather than clunky medical looking like devices) now available; adherence in using such devices is also improving rapidly. Especially in disease where disease morbidity is high, and patients are motivated to learn more about their disease progress.
So we looked at appropriate technology and found, encouragingly, that virtually all CHWs either owned or had access to a mobile phone. But we also found that only 9% of them had ever sent a text message. So while they have phones, they use them for making and receiving phone calls - nothing else.
There's no one place to see all of the information on our son, whether that's his medical records or progress reports. We combine this information and analysis ourselves on our home PC and in multiple ring binders.
The concept of mHealth is nothing new. Smartphones, apps and wearable devices are already successfully helping people to quit smoking, lose weight, manage their diabetes and track activity, such as running and walking.
Health workers in developing countries face challenges that are often taken for granted in the developed world, but new technologies have the potential to become leap frog solutions that address such barriers.
The new drug regulatory authority does present a case for hope, but if the systemic impediments and potential distortions and loopholes in the law are not addressed, it may lead to an even worse failure than what the earlier red-tape variant of drug regulation resulted in.