migrant workers

To stay clear of an unfavorable or even disastrous exit from the EU it would be perhaps be wise for Britain to resolve the issue of migrant workers, as will continue to need these workers post Brexit. It can do this by ensuring their rights as a priority and working to ensure their own with a more friendly EU partner in return.
Even though the dust from the 2015 General Election has only just begun to settle, the political news agenda has already
As a hardworking Polish migrant in Britain, the thought of Nigel Farage sticking on the kettle at Number 10 is a terrifying thought. But, like the million viewers across the country who tuned in, we were forced to picture this distressing scenario during Channel 4's UKIP: The First 100 Days last Monday.
Last week I was in Camberwell, South London when I was drugged, shaved, cut open and had part of my insides removed. There must have been about 40 people involved in total, mostly foreign migrant workers. They pushed me around and made bloody well sure they got what they wanted as quickly as they could before I was sent on my way, back into the mean streets of the capital. It has taken me since then to build up the strength to write this blog. Now I want to thank those who did what they did because they probably saved my life.
Wirat Piyapornpaiboon is making the same mistake as McDonalds, but it isn't too late to change yet. He might find dropping the cases now to be personally embarrassing, but even if he wins the cases in a Thai court, he will lose in the court of public opinion, in the media, and in the business world. Any good businessman knows when the time has come to cut your losses and move on. For Wirat Piyapornpaiboon, that time is now.
Compare and contrast. In a few years' time several hundred professional footballers from all over the world will arrive in the Gulf state of Qatar to take part in the 2022 World Cup... Meanwhile, during the same period in mid-2022, it's very likely that several hundred other overseas workers will arrive at the always-overcrowded Doha International Airport.
Britain relies heavily on entrepreneurial migrants to launch businesses, create jobs and grow the economy. As we strive to improve our national economic performance in a highly competitive global market, our politicians, education system, businesses and the media cannot afford to ignore such an important source of economic dynamism.
I'll admit to a special interest in this - like 11.4% of the British population, I am foreign born, indeed a twice-migrant since I lived for five years in Bangkok after I left my native Australia before choosing to become British.
My reading habits being rather gadfly-ish (ie all over the place), the other day I picked up a book lying around at work
A 56-year-old Indian man is facing the death penalty in Abu Dhabi for a crime he says he did not commit. Abandoned by his Embassy and former colleagues, Ezhur Gangadharan is in a desperate place. On 11 November he will appeal his conviction and his only hope is that support from the international community will pressure authorities into reviewing his case.