miliband

Let's concede something straight off: virtually no one expected this. Not the Trump campaign which, according to CNN, believed it had lost when the early returns started coming in. Certainly not the Clinton campaign, which was about ready to start its victory celebrations when the polls began closing on the East Coast.
24 November 2014, Morten Moreland, The Times The political cartoon, Benson says, is a particular British specialty. Particularly
To stop a repeat of 2015, Labour must make itself a viable option by electing a leader which people could conceivably see at No. 10. Miliband did not fill this criteria. Hopefully the next leader will, and this will go part way to ensuring England and Wales sway back to the left so Scottish Labour are not forced to split on the grounds that their political attitudes contrast too much with their rUK colleagues.
General elections in Britain seldom throw up moments of high drama. Aside from the occasional bitter fight in a key marginal or a tasty televised clash where the gloves finally come off, most electioneering is predictably dull.
It has taken a lot to get here, the heartbreak and confusion, a crisis in my being. However, I finally feel as if society is at a point to accept me for who I am, that I can look myself in the eye and say: I am who I am... I am an Ed Miliband fan.
So let us harness the fact that we have this incredible scenario where there is female representation. And let us use it to push all the political parties to talk in gendered terms, and acknowledge the fact that socio economic inequality in the UK is gendered. And it has to change.
We've hit the part of the General Election campaign that really starts to get on my nerves. The funny thing is, I genuinely think this vote could be one of the most interesting in the UK's history, given how disillusionment with large swathes of the political spectrum has resulted in no one party looking capable of gaining an overall majority...
Miliband's announcement on Friday that he would cap profits which private firms make from hospital treatment at 5% and that Labour would end the requirement for all health contracts to be opened up to the NHS certainly sounds like a winning policy.
It's annoying when that sort of thinking applies to people. The fact that something as complex as a human being can be boiled down to their accent or their football team is a shame. But the deeper problem is that it happens to issues, too.
Poverty and human rights campaigners have expressed alarm at the revelation that the young girl begging for change pictured