mobile devices

These days you will be hard pressed to find a child who doesn't have access to technology - a device that is permanently glued to their nose and the only 'toy' that will keep them entertained without screaming down the house to be quiet.
Beauty and The Beast set me up with some unrealistic expectations of my household furnishings. Whilst the Internet of Things (IoT) may not yet have given candelabras a quippy sentience, it has given standard home fixtures a secret life. However, this isn't quite the heart-warming picture Disney painted for us.
So I ask you, how is riding a bike any different from using the internet? We need to nurture our children, explain right from wrong, make them aware of the dangers lurking around every corner and to always think
In order to prevent online fraud, it is important for businesses to recognise where their infrastructure is most vulnerable, educate employees effectively and work with the right partners to keep up with an evolving cyber security landscape.
Once upon a time, tablets could do no wrong. Ownership and usage rates were growing dramatically, new models were flooding the market and the smaller screens of smartphones were being seriously criticised. Tablets were the must-have devices which combined the functionality of laptops with the portability of mobiles.
Many teachers qualified when 'using technology' meant rolling out a TV on wheels, or doing something truly exotic with PowerPoint. There is very little point banging on about teachers having twenty-first century skills, we should have been there 15 years ago.
The meteoric rise of mobile devices has transformed the behaviour of consumers everywhere, and marketers are now living in a world where almost every individual is interacting with them digitally across multiple devices.
The proliferation of connected devices, from connected cars to toothbrushes, has led to a new ecosystem of gadgets that must be able to communicate with each other in order to work and create personalised user experiences effectively.
If you spend a good portion of your day with a phone glued to your hand (and your eyes firmly fixed on the screen) then chances
Despite negative media coverage and accusations that the app places too much emphasis on users' appearances and proximity to one another, Tinder shows no signs of slowing down. The app's success is not based on algorithms and might shed light on a new approach to mobile advertising.