mobile payments

Modern consumers are different beasts to their/our parents' generation. The way bills are paid, taxis booked, newspapers read and even birthday cards sent has changed and barring the occasional retro experience, we are not looking back.
Over the last 18 months the masses truly have converted from cash to card, but while retailers, retail services companies and even religious institutions are all bending the knee at the altar of the contactless card, I'm reluctant to believe the hype
The global payments landscape is a complicated place. Technologies like digital retail wallets have made it easier than ever before for us to tap, swipe and pay. New innovations allow us to scan barcodes, add to shopping carts and receive geo-targeted updates, discounts and offers on the go.
With the advent of a new generation of payment terminals that make it possible to deliver the type of interaction during in-store transactions that customers are now expecting and retailers want to deliver.
The implementation of mobile payment into applications should be streamlined as well and developers should not be required to reinvent the wheel. Robles' team of developers is working on a set of APIs and user interface components that can be easily understood and plugged into banking and financial applications.
In recent years East Africa has emerged as a hotbed of creative solutions to meeting people's energy needs as I saw for myself during my visit to Kenya and Tanzania earlier this year. The nexus between clean energy and mobile-based technology is one that is helping bring power to some of the remotest corners of the continent.
A year after the launch, we have processed over £2 million gross transactions through Collins Pay and we are expecting over 100% year on year growth. By focusing on a space where transactions were already happening in vast quantities, but analysing how it could be done better for our clients and their customers whilst integrating this directly into their current booking flows, Collins Pay stands alone in this space.
A study has found that the overwhelming majority of us still have reservations about using our smartphones to pay for things
Allowing users to verify their identities and log in to websites and mobile applications using existing profiles from networks such as Facebook and LinkedIn not only creates a more streamlined experience for consumers, it also enables marketers to capture and leverage rich, first-party social identity data.
With the launch of Samsung Pay at Mobile World Congress 2015 - and with the Apple Watch just around the corner - the chatter
Starbucks has started trialling a test in Portland, Oregon that'll let you open up the Starbucks app, choose your drink and
Apple Pay, the contactless and in-app purchasing system announced by Apple this week... is not that amazing something.
Mobile commerce is on the up and up, and your eCommerce business will need to ensure you're up to the play when it comes to mobile payments if you want to keep pace in 2014 and beyond. Here are Worldpay's top tips for optimising your online mobile payments.
While Facebook, WhatsApp, Viber and the like are locked in an arms race to help users send photos and videos with increasing speed (and discretion), one London based startup is looking to capture a more niche part of the chat market: sending money.
The speed at which the mobile market evolves is staggering. We have seen disruptive technologies such as the tablet really change the way we interact and go about our daily lives in recent years, both as consumers and within business.
Towards the end of last year I spent a number of weeks on holiday with my family in Tanzania. On our way back from visiting a town by the coast, we found ourselves in a village with no more than a few dozen inhabitants.
We have been hearing about the advent of mobile payments for a long time - both from mobile providers and banking institutions.
It's not quite paying for stuff with your veins - but it's getting closer. Paym ("pay-em"), a new mobile payment service
Airlines have long been reliant on credit cards as the primary payment type they accept online. However, as carriers' margins are increasingly squeezed, the industry is becoming more aware of the importance of enabling alternative payment methods to gain competitive advantage - and new research shows mobile is top of mind.
Unfortunately, this future has failed to materialise. When I'm commuting home tonight, I'll pass by more than a handful of retailers. And, to the best of my knowledge, only one of them, a purveyor of ready-to-eat sarnies, accepts contactless cards.