mobile technology

Today no one can dispute that the world seems to have gone haywire. If we weren't already in a state of frenetic group hysteria
The economic benefits of rural internet use are far from realised in Africa. New technology is lowering the costs of rural coverage.
Because mobile-first workers are now used to the 'Swipe left. Swipe right' ease of consumer life, their frustration and irritation with the tools they are expected to use is on the rise. Why would an employee be okay with having to log in and spend thirty minutes filling out expenses, approving a purchase order, or logging a field service visit when they can order a pizza with three thumb clicks?
As varied as the choice of smartphones on offer are, one thing they all have in common is the undeniable ability to frustrate their users by failing to detect a connection signal. Seemingly bamboozled by even the smallest obstructions, current smartphone technology is not as synonymous with reliability as it would like to pretend.
There is no doubt that mobile messaging is extremely efficient. Individuals can gain immediate access to colleagues, customers and contacts outside the company to help them arrive at decisions faster and achieve better outcomes.
From the moment you meet someone, to whether you end up walking into the sunset hand-in-hand or with your mates at a pub drowning your sorrows - the life cycle of all our relationships are played out using technology.
As the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) draws to a close for another year, we've seen a wide range of new gadgets and tech capabilities that could transform our daily lives in the near or not-so-near future. From drones, AI robots and virtual reality to a whole clutch of "smart" devices, we're now left to debate which of the items debuted at CES will enter the mainstream.
As both an educator, an active member and volunteer of the education community, Alefiya Bhatia recognized that it was not
They're the tangible expression of the breakneck pace of technological change - a pocket-sized device more powerful than the desktop computers of 20 years ago, helping to connect people in ways that were unimaginable even a couple of decades back.
To any non-technical person out there, the large and varied tech sector can be intimidating. So when I arrived at my interview with the Chief Technology Officer of Skyscanner, who has a doctorate from Oxford University, I was a bit apprehensive of sounding like an ignorant fool to say the least.