mods

Mod was very often routed in class. Working class young men who wanted to look super smart when they went out at the weekend and would save for months to buy the right clothes. Add into the mix a carefully selected mix of music, a penchant for drugs to keep them dancing all night and the desire to prove they were not defined by a dreary office job - and you have a template that can be repeated whatever the year.
Where are the youngsters picking up a guitar and screaming songs about the patriarchy in such a compelling way? Why are there not more young people dressing crazy and going mad for their particular brand of music?
Mods have been a free resource for close to twenty years. Mod creators have never gone into development thinking about making a profit, and the main goal has always been to make something cool or interesting to share with people.
A band like iC1s, who sit calmly within the vanguard of the London scene and are rated by the likes of Carl Barat and Alan McGee, possess a lot of the old, natural swagger.
Things have changed in the world of publishing and the literary festival is now perhaps the only means by which the industry at large can bridge the ever-widening gap between the writer and his reading public.
While informed by the likes of Bacharach, Bolan and The Animals - as heard on The Moons' Jan 'Stan' Kybert-produced album Fables Of History (2012) - Crofts has taken a pop classicism and updated it without having mired himself in the black hole of revivalism.
'No political or cultural figurehead has ever come up with the phrase "a British dream", so Mod appeals to me politically because it's the closest we've ever come to having an American Dream.' So says Richard Weight, author of Mod: A Very British Style.
Minchella learned the business the hard way - perhaps the best way - on the pub circuit, playing professionally for the first time in 1987, two years before the golden break with Ocean Colour Scene.
He's a strange brew, at once funny, then turning on a dime, as serious as a prophet. Born in Belfast in 1963, Michael Smiley grew up in a cultural atmosphere which fed his ire, and ultimately, his humour.
'We're a gigging band in Scotland,' Andy Clucas tells me. 'We started as an acoustic band back in the winter of 2007, and a lot of people told us we had a Dexys [Midnight Runners] sound, probably because our sound is...eclectic.'