Money Laundering

When corrupt politicians, public officials and business people steal public funds, they prefer to keep those funds in safe places. The UK is one such safe place. These funds laundered in and through the UK represent misery for millions of people around the world...
All governments face hard choices. Transparency International's new 'Anti-Corruption Scorecard' suggests that this Government has some particularly important choices to make on its approach to corruption.
Companies are not the only ones to have discovered the opportunities offered by an increasingly globalised world. Some 3,600 criminal gangs are active in more than one country in the EU and of those 70% boast an international work force and 30% commit more than one type of crime. Worldwide organised crime costs the global economy €670 billion a year. Crime on this scale can only be successfully be countered at an international level.
One of government minister Vince Cable's first headaches this autumn will be to decide whether to allow the public to find out who really controls 2.5 million companies in the UK. You could be forgiven for thinking that such information is already out there, perhaps on the internet or from Companies House - but you'd be wrong.
Criminal organisations are increasingly making use of the opportunities offered by globalisation with groups forging alliances with counterparts in other countries.
A police officer who tried to run a brothel, money launder and supply class A drugs has been suspended from the force and
A "corrupt" detective stole massive amounts of seized drugs and conspired to sell them with his brother in a plot that made
A long time ago, when words like globalisation and deregulation were still rumours on the political horizon, the Pakistani financier Agha Hasan Abedi founded the Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI) in 1972. BCCI was originally intended to be a progressive international Third World bank that would compete with Western-based financial institutions, and it was strikingly successful, with some 400 branches in 78 countries.
The head of compliance at British banking giant HSBC resigned in front of a US Senate subcommittee today after it emerged
Lax controls at HSBC allowed Mexican drug cartels to launder billions of dollars through the bank's US operations, an investigation