multinational corporations

This is why as we marked the occasion of Right to Know Day, I joined the protest outside this latest reading room in Brussels. It is totally inappropriate for private companies to control transparency in this way and to put their profits ahead of our right to information. We need to put the "freedom" back into "freedom of information." so that we know how our health and environment might be impacted. As policy makers we have a right to verify or challenge findings and to work for the public good.
We had all bought into the idea of a post-war world order. Countries would co-operate to devise a system of 'global governance
Despite their claims to be leading the global fight against tax avoidance, British Conservatives have been vociferous in
I wandered into a beautiful Shoreditch boutique called Labour and Wait the other day, and walked out with brown paper bags full of plain enamelled pie dishes and school canteen tumblers. Unpacking my purchases at home, I wondered why, given the asceticism of my purchases, I still felt my usual pang of shopper's guilt. If anything, it felt even worse.
Over the past week Romanian government officials, mining industry figures, and several other parties championing the planned
Britain is open for business, the Government is keen to say, and there are signs over the past few weeks that global firms are indeed looking seriously at entering the door. Yes, the UK offers a business-friendly tax culture. Yes, the workforce is trained and motivated in many areas. But there are complications that could trip up the unwary.
In his pre-G8 speech the Prime Minister once again raised "the golden thread" theory which posits a link between open economies and open societies. Eradicating conflict and corruption, establishing the rule of law, free speech and the presence of property rights and strong institutions are central to this.
the Office of Cultural Affairs. She was in her 60s, and had been born and raised in Las Vegas (unusual for a woman of her generation).
What propels Romania into the category of 'World's First Dystopia' is the massive cyanide mining project that could turn Transylvania, one of the most beautiful and pristine parts of Europe, into a dystopic wasteland. It is also a case study in how corporate PR and marketing can convince a population that the destruction of their ecosystem is in their own interest.
We, and our politicians, love to moralise about the rank unfairness of multinational corporations paying so little tax. And it's quite understandable we should. As we suffer austerity measures on one side and higher food and energy bills on the other, why should multinational corporations get off so lightly? Well, they shouldn't.