musculoskeletal conditions

Arthritis is a condition that causes stiffness and swelling in the joints. One in six of us have arthritis and one in five will consult a GP about a musculoskeletal problem each year. It is the leading cause of pain and disability in the UK.
Arthritis is one of the biggest public health issues facing the UK. Yet it is all too often passed off as being an inevitable or even an acceptable part of getting older. This perception is wrong, completely underestimates the condition and means that people with arthritis do not get the support and help they need to live well.
Most of us know that being physically active is important for our overall health and wellbeing. Not only does exercise help to control weight, but it also boosts energy and can help combat health conditions and improve mood. This especially holds true for people with rheumatoid arthritis.
Osteoarthritis is commonly called "wear and tear" of the joints and happens when the cartilage that surrounds the bone ends and normally protects the joints from impact becomes worn and thinner.
This week marks National Arthritis Week, a critical moment in the history of the condition, which, I hope, will help to focus policymakers' attention on the plight of millions lacking mobility and experiencing pain as a result.
Our digital devices pose such an irresistible temptation, many of us secretly wish the choice of whether or not to be on screen would be taken from us - at least occasionally. Consider the holiday destinations where you have to hand over your digital devices in order to check in.
I heard that due to concerns about her privacy, Rihanna has abandoned her smartphone for an old-style flip phone. I too have concerns about privacy (though I suspect my reasons may not be the same as Rihanna's), but that's not why I've resisted getting a smartphone.
Now that we can take our work anywhere - we do. But typically, we don't take our ergonomic accessories with us. It's understandable - who really wants to lug a laptop stand, detachable keyboard and mouse to Starbucks?
Pain associated with the use of computers and other digital devices is now a common occurrence. It's no surprise as all of us are on our devices from the moment we wake up in the morning until right before we shut our eyes again at night.
So short of changing chairs a lot, and giving everyone Alexander Technique (though I do recommend both), what can businesses do with regards to chairs to protect their employees? What chairs should they buy?