myriam francois-cerrah

In the government's latest Orwellian measure, mothers and wives of "would-be jihadists" are ‎being urged to report on their loved ones, avowedly to "prevent tragedies". It won't escape notice ‎however, that despite protestations to the contrary, a message emanating from the police carries ‎criminalising potential. ‎
The Muslim community is far from perfect, but our misrepresentation as ‎squabbling men who need reforming through those who have themselves rejected the faith is ‎palpably absurd. Who speaks for Muslims? How about the myriad Muslims doing the hard graft on ‎the ground.‎
Whether or not students want to segregate, in a liberal and democratic society the right to practising one's faith stops where one starts imposing it on others. Contrary to what some assert, there is no right of the religiously observant to impose their sensibilities on others.
Muslims eh, they just cant seem to take a joke can they? It would be very easy to cast, as many ‎commentators have, the latest riots in response to the islamophobic film, as another example of ‎intolerant Muslims lacking a funny bone.
The struggle against islamophobia is the struggle for a nuanced and ‎contextualised appraisal of events involving Muslims, a refusal to accept ‎that everything can be explained away through a facile reference to 'Islam' ‎and a defence of a European minority group. There is nothing Orwellian ‎about that.‎
The sex slave trade in this country is sadly alive and ‎well and is not primarily Asian driven. Any abhorrent link some may seek to make between race and inherent ‎sexually predatory behaviour is not born out by the facts.
Hollande has marketed himself as the ‎candidate of 'change', the central concept in his slogan and the recurrent leitmotif of his speeches, ‎banking on Sarkozy's unpopularity and on the feeling that France needs a new, alternative vision.‎