Nate Silver

We jump on these sporting narratives because they help us understand a complex set of circumstances and seem to make an unpredictable tournament seem more predictable. These narratives are continued by brands, media and rights holders because they successfully bring people closer to the game, but they don't necessarily speak to what is really going on. To truly judge England at major tournaments, the skill is getting behind the headline, and finding the complicated reasons, not the simple ones.
Ed Miliband has made it clear, on numerous occasions, he won't get into bed with Nicola Sturgeon. In fact some of his most passionate responses have come when dealing with this question. We now know Russell Brand has more chance of securing a cabinet position as there is clearly a very good chance he and Ed have at least shared a bed.
Will Nate's selling out to ESPN for a few pieces of silver, and leaving the venerable NYT, be worth it? Are we truly at the tipping point of a new type of journalism to take hold? Or is this just more hype in the news cycle which should invoke in us a healthy dose of skepticism?
Labour's lead over the Tories just isn't big enough, says the party's doom-and-gloom brigade, and has often fallen below the six-point mark. So? As YouGov's Anthony Wells confirms, on a uniform swing and assuming the Liberal Democrats get 15 per cent of the vote, the Conservatives need a lead of seven points to secure a Commons majority, whereas Labour needs just two.
Nate Silver, the American statistician who shot to fame after predicting the results of the most recent US Presidential election
We all know that the world's average temperature hasn't changed much for ten or fifteen years. As a result, warnings about dangerous global warming appear to have been awry. Static temperatures for the last decade don't disprove the predictions of pessimistic climate models, but they do make them less likely.
The idea that this is a genuine exercise in localism just simply isn't credible, because the coalition is only interested in devolving power to two sectors: the private and the voluntary. If you want to know what Cameron and Osborne really think of local government, go and count the number of empty offices at council buildings across the land.