national debt

Like the Greeks, we need to sweep such false political exigences aside and have a properly informed, national conversation about where the strategy of deficit reduction leads. Especially if the main tool being used is a blind and sweeping worship of the concept of austerity.
The election result was a big shock: no one predicted the Conservatives would win an outright majority and no one forecast the SNP tsunami. It has shown us that the old rules no long apply. What once was does not have to be. Despite the perceived political differences, if towns and cities across the UK grasp that, the future doesn't have to be blue.
Talk of the deficit is very much in vogue, and the opposition leaders are fighting like toddlers in a ball pit in an attempt to air their own plans to cut the country's deficit. Meanwhile, Dave and fellow toff George Osbourne look so chuffed about cutting the deficit by only taking money from people who were never going to vote for them in the first place, that they risk bursting into an unholy Eton mess.
The national debt doubled, wages stagnating, insecure and low paid work rampant, living standards falling and basic quality of life - having a vocation, a home, a family, being able to eat - becoming ever harder to obtain. The barometers of real economic health - wage growth, household debt, government debt, and productivity - are all pointing the wrong way.
After the Greatest Generation, the Baby Boomers, Generation X and the Millennials, today's young people look set to be Generation Screwed unless politicians take action. With less than six weeks until the election, politicians should stop treating young people as a youthful but silent cash cow of borrowed money, just because they don't cast as many votes as the elderly.
It is clear that the Conservative Party's longer-term economic plan is working. They are cutting income tax for over 25 million people, saving the typical tax payer £705 a year. They are cutting the jobs tax saving businesses up to £2,000 enabling businesses to hire more people...
Taxes should play a "significantly" larger role in paying down Britain's national deficit than envisaged by either Nick Clegg
A "very kind, generous and public-spirited gesture". That's how George Osborne acknowledged one pensioner's decision to pay back their Winter Fuel Payment. The benefit, worth between £100 and £300, is paid to around 12 million pensioners each year to help them meet the cost of heating their homes over the winter months.
To mere mortals, 'debt' is a four-letter word - something to be eschewed on pain of the workhouse or some equally grizzly fate. There's a whole industry in the UK that focuses on debt collection - lawyers, bailiffs and professional debt collectors who go by a number of rather fanciful 'noms de guerre'.
The dawn of a New Year is a looking forward to what is to come and for reflection, a time for taking stock. There are two things we know will happen during 2014...