native

Firstly, it has the attitude, plus an enviable diversity of culture which is delivering its own unique and particular breed of new mobile apps. We're already working with a couple of home grown New York apps businesses such as Gilt, the designer sales shopping app.
Concern over technology affecting our brains persists - and is getting louder and more dystopian... we are connected more, but retaining less - how many phone numbers can you recall now?
Arguably the fastest-growing technology the world has seen is mobile and it is also the biggest technological drive of social and economic change. The app economy has paved the way that enables for everything from games and entertainment, to education and healthcare, to retail and overall productivity; leaving an idelible mark on our daily lives.
If ad verification isn't taken seriously, it will be the end of digital advertising as we know it. The industry has to grow and the only way it can is through universal verification that is accepted by the entire ecosystem.
You are almost certainly well-educated, quite possibly with a university degree that has equipped you with an excellent foundation of knowledge and skills - theoretically that's a pretty good starting point
Valleyspeak has made a comeback. But not the LA valley girl dialect that defined the nineties (like, seriously?). In the past week, Silicon Valley has gone gaga about a new instant messaging app / social network that only allows you to communicate with one word: Yo!
I've been talking for some time about the changing world of work, and how traditional working life patterns of employment and doing business are increasingly less relevant in today's workplace. A combination of economics, technology and changing attitudes is forcing change upon us, like it or not.
It's a mixed bag of beautiful and not so beautiful people, deals, schmoozing, ego inflating, celebrity spotting and awards, with one of the chicest backdrops in the world. A global telecoms client of mine recently laughed as he found the fact there was a multi million pound festival built around people congratulating themselves for being brilliant, was quite absurd!
Paul's worked in a men's clothing wholesalers, but his real passion was cycling and he hoped to be a professional racing cyclist. When he was 17, he had an accident that put an end to this ambition. While in hospital, he made friends with some 'arty types' and his life had just taken him in an entirely new and unexpected direction.
Words as pegs. For ideas. I've always liked that idea. What I also find so eloquently smart and cunning about words is what they don't say, but rather what they evoke.