natural history

It's widely acknowledged by all who think rationally that we are living in worrying times. I myself have taken to adopting a 'fight or flight' response to watching the news. Should I pull a 'three wise monkeys' and make out like everything is okay? Or do I sink into the breach and confront things head on?
They're not quite the classic brain-eating, gormless slow-shufflers of horror movies, but in the animal kingdom, the zombie threat is very real. The culprit? Parasites: small organisms with complex life cycles that set up camp inside their animal hosts.
Travelling from state to state can often feel like entering a whole new country. It's food, the people, architecture, the weather, literally everything may seem completely world's away from wherever you might have just been. Though you may have just ventured mere miles in reality.
The dinosaurs featured range from the truly weird and wonderful sauropelta edwardsorun and the bizarre Brachiosaurus, to the mighty, meat-eating Tyrannosaurus. And Csotonyi covers a significant time period, depicting precursors to modern mammals and birds.
I believe that we as documentary makers in general and natural history commissioners and producers in particular have a responsibility to lead by some kind of example. Blurring the edges of truth with overly elaborate recreations doesn't help viewers re-establish that human bond with the natural world which has always been important, and which I think is going to be utterly essential in the coming years.
For nearly 25 years of wildlife filmmaking I have been quietly fascinated by the unsung heroes, the little creatures, that live beneath our feet. I have encouraged their inclusion in the odd sequence or two in many or the programmes I've been involved in from The Trials of Life to Africa.