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As we approach the first anniversary of the Iranian nuclear deal, tens of thousands of activists and Iranian dissidents are set to rally this Saturday in Paris, calling for Tehran's nefarious conduct at home and in the region to be tackled. One of the primary messages at this rally will be to condemn Iran's role in the massacre of the Syrian people and to demand an end to its assistance to the Assad government.
Though change may not come overnight, this conference in Paris is both timely and important - a potentially crucial pointer in the right direction towards resolving to one of the most difficult and dangerous foreign policy issues of our time, namely Iran. It surely deserves greater strategic comprehension and attention from our Governments.
I remember almost a year ago, the enormous crowds that came together all across France, to rally against extremism. This
My colleagues and I from both Houses of Parliament and all major parties, prominent Middle East experts and jurists today
On June 25, the member countries of the European Union will participate in a summit in Brussels. It is expected to be the scene of some energetic debate between the UK on the one hand and France and Germany on the other, regarding the future of the EU.
On Thursday, London hosted a major conference to discuss the ISIS threat and strategies for confronting Islamic extremism
The Obama administration and the European Union must end their silence and inaction regarding these crimes and should adopt concrete steps to help the new Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi in evicting the Iranian regime from Iraq. Failure to do so will turn the Middle East into a quagmire of sectarian war with no end in sight.
For the West to acknowledge that there are at least two prominent enemies to freedom and stability in the Middle East would be a start. But by embracing one and opposing the other the West may disrupt the current flow of violence, but it will never halt the growth of extremism. As long as a Shiite theocracy remains in place in Iran, new Sunni extremists will always stand ready to compete with it for control over the soul of the Muslim world.
Ignoring the devious humbug from Vienna, perhaps Paris on June 27 might just be the right place from which to set the principles necessary to re-start with a new, humane and more realistic policy on Iran.
Several days ago a man with a neatly trimmed beard wearing a white turban, and professorial-looking rimless glasses featured prominently in Davos. Was it really Hassan Rouhani? Of course Rouhani is Iran's current Ayatollah-sanctioned President and should have every good reason to be at such a prestigious forum; however the man addressing Davos appeared only to share the real Rouhani's appearance.