nepal earthquake 2015

In the days following the earthquake, despite the snow and freezing temperature, families were forced to sleep outside, scared to go indoors because of the damage to buildings and the threat of aftershocks. After the earthquakes many families had no choice but to sleep out in the open. The earthquakes not only destroyed their homes and their schools, but left millions of children scared and in danger. They needed shelter; food, water and medical supplies, and also support to deal with the traumatic events they had experienced, and the chance to get back to school as soon as possible.
The devastating impact of the earthquake on the economy and hence employment also means many men are migrating overseas, leaving behind an increasing number of women headed households having to look after families alone... Shreya however, like many Nepalese people, is optimistic about the future.
We are all taken aback by the striking images projected in the wake of devastating natural disasters. In recent months the
We all remember the harrowing images in our newspapers and on our TV screens of people who had lost their homes, their livelihoods and their loved ones. It is thanks to charities like ActionAid, who were already on the ground and able to respond immediately, that hundreds of thousands of people received life-saving supplies and assistance. But now the cameras have gone so much more still needs to be done particularly as there is a new threat to the country - monsoon season.
I have been left saddened by the scale of destruction and the impact the damage has had on children in particular, but also pleased to see the good progress the aid effort is making only three months on from the earthquake.
Standing in Chautara village, I got a 360 degree view of rubble-lined streets, buildings that had been yanked from their foundations and homes teetering off the hilltops. This is the true scale of devastation left by the Nepal earthquake.
f these day to day deaths happened in the UK we'd be outraged and I think a time is coming, as we get more globally connected, when we'll feel the urgency, as we see those like us struggling to survive. Extreme poverty really is the daily emergency of our times.
Most events I go to are a mixture of good and bad, hope and despair. But this day was one of unremitting misery. Nothing good happened. Nobody was saved, the only people pulled from the wreckage had died days before.
These aerial photographs show how Nepalese villagers are surviving in makeshift tents and relying on food drops after a huge