new media

In the autumn of 1998, in the midst of impeachment proceedings against former US President Bill Clinton, a couple from Silicon Valley launched a one-sentence petition online. Their demand of Congress was simple...
A Harvard professor lectures on how whole industries have found it impossible to reinvent themselves in the face of technological revolution. He tells newspaper groups they will have to change almost everything in order to survive. Along comes his church (yes) and asks him to save their own 160-year-old daily paper. In a few short years, the professor becomes a media industry hero.
How can you convince people to listen to your music if you don't have any way to communicate with them? How can you put across the actual music without finding a way of playing it to them? How can you expect people to spend money on you when they have no idea what they're paying for?
The Polvaulting story is not a straightforward relaying of the facts. It takes the bare premise of the facts as its starting point and then builds a surreal but humorous play on hypothesis around them; of what might happen if a rogue American General gave the order to attack North Korea.
As a games designer I wanted to explore issues in the real world and it is natural for me to turn to the medium of games to do that. Making a game exploring an ongoing war was always going to get a reaction, though this was not our motivation.
Over the past few days, a video showing the Infowars.com host, Alex Jones' tirade against CNN anchor Piers Morgan has become a viral sensation. Within the space of 15 minutes, Jones not only declared Morgan as a "hatchet man of the new world order" but also might threatened war on the Obama administration if any action to forcibly seize guns took place.
Despite only being a bundle of cells, Olivier has already developed a fledgling inter-uterine social networking service, called Womb2Womb, which allows the unborn offspring of successful people to communicate with each other before they are even born.
Convergence of communication devices has been a concept discussed for nearly the last 20 years as something that will happen. But today it is a reality and guess what - it isn't a keyboard connected to your connected TV playing online video or your TV playing on a mobile device.
What will the newspaper of the future look like in - say - 2086? Media experts share their prophecies.
Why is our advertising stuck in the 20th Century? Why are our ads not as dynamic and up to date as the information we are constantly consuming through our unlimited data plans, broadband connections, and digital touchscreens?