new mothers

It's an umbilical cord - it nourished and connected baby to mother for nine months. Without it there would be no baby - it is a miraculous part of our human engineering and so why does it provoke a reaction of such disgust? Rochelle is proud of hers - so why does her decision to preserve it warrant such discussion?
I must confess, at the beginning, I found breastfeeding very daunting and scary because I have heard so many stories from mothers who have already gone through the experience of breastfeeding in public--and they were not good experiences.
But just because celebs are advocating it, with all their worldly wisdom (and cash) does that mean that eating your placenta actually does you any good? Medically speaking, it would seem that the answer is a resounding no. In fact there are even questions raised over its risks.
The take home message of any breastfeeding promo shouldn't seek to make mothers feel there is only one route. Simply put by Geraldine Miskin, author of Breastfeeding Made Easy, you have to bare in mind "it isn't always easy but all mums can do is their best, so they shouldn't be hard on themselves".
I love feel-good stories like this, and it all started 16 months ago when Jade started drawing these cartoons as a way of finding the funny side of the trials and tribulations of raising her son, Abel.
During pregnancy a woman's body must go through a stunning transformation. Her blood volume will nearly double to support the growing foetus, her organs will be pushed to the side by an expanding uterus, her breasts will swell in preparation for lactation and her hormones will rise and dip exponentially.
New motherhood can be stifling: you're always with your baby. Time to yourself is such a healer. Leave your baby with the person you trust most (partner, mother?) and go for a quick tea/ walk/ shopping trip on your own.
I am having a major insight this week. Here goes: Guilt = response to what one does. Shame = response to what one IS. Which one is at work for me, and for other breastfeeding mothers?
Nobody should ever judge mothers on the choices they make when it comes to balancing work and family life; it should always be a personal choice. But this choice needs to be a meaningful one, not simply picking the least worst option. Unfortunately, this still isn't the case for far too many women. We can and we must do better.
One in seven new mothers suffer from depression, so it will come as a relief that British doctors have identified the first
I never believed in the word depression, let alone postnatal depression, how could anyone possibly be depressed after having a baby I wondered?
The NHS is working with private companies to make money by persuading new mums to buy photographs of their new babies and