New Statesman

Why do we obsess over handouts for the poor, rather than handouts for the rich? Why isn't the scandal of corporate welfare the subject of fly-on-the-wall documentaries, too? When will my former colleagues at Channel 4 air a series called Bankers' Street?
A break-up of the eurozone may be where we are headed if spending cuts take precedence over debt defaults and if the financial crisis continues to be cynically portrayed as a morality play. What the continent needs is a debt jubilee and a halt to austerity. Oh, and some solidarity. Otherwise, a second Great Depression beckons.
Russell Brand has defended his call for a revolution against the political system, insisting that he is, unsurprisingly, not
Arguing is good. It is essential. You might be wrong but you might eventually find that you're right. You might be misguided but you might take the debate to a more interesting place.
The appeal of Russell Brand's revolutionary ramblings lies in the paradox at the heart of this idea. Like every other ideology that came before it, negative liberty appears to transcend every other ideology.
It is genuinely hard work to decide - below the affected accent, and the lexicographical obfuscation (see what I did there?) - whether Brand is actually saying something worthwhile. In his interview with Jeremy Paxman, Brand managed to say very little.
We have had a massive £375billion of quantative easing so far, which may have saved the financial sector but has done very little for the rest of us. That amounts to around £6,000 per man, woman and child in the UK. So why not electronically add this to the current accounts of every member of the public? Why not give the QE money directly to ordinary people to spend, save or pay off their debts?
Frustration and anger at politicians and the Westminster village serves to turn ordinary people off politics altogether, rather
Both GTA and the Arctic Monkeys have cleverly grown with their fans, knowing that standing still is the biggest mistake you can make. Helen Lewis, deputy editor of the New Statesman quite rightly reminded us on the Today Programme that the average age of a gamer is now 30.
Labour's lead over the Tories just isn't big enough, says the party's doom-and-gloom brigade, and has often fallen below the six-point mark. So? As YouGov's Anthony Wells confirms, on a uniform swing and assuming the Liberal Democrats get 15 per cent of the vote, the Conservatives need a lead of seven points to secure a Commons majority, whereas Labour needs just two.