nfu

Having grown up on a farm in a productive farming area of south west Wales, it's unsurprising to most that TV wasn't a big
The headline figure is that we only provide 62% of the country's food supply. And this is set to get worse. The UK is on course to become the most populous country in the European Union - an estimated 77million people by 2040 - and official figures suggest our ability to feed ourselves will drop to just 53% by then. So, my message today is: it is time to Back British Farming.
What the Caffe Nero situation has taught us is that each individual retailer or outlet should stand firmly by their procurement policies - and not differentiate between milk that is and is not perceived to be from the cull areas. This is an approach that will have most force.
The next few months will see the closest fought election in a generation. Already the economy, welfare, health and education have been occupying headline space as some of the most important issues which affect people and therefore their vote. But where is food in this debate? More importantly, where is safe, secure, traceable British food?
Given that Lord Krebs could hardly maintain his 'it's a waste of money' position in the face of this overwhelming scientific evidence, he has changed tack, claiming at Oxford that organic farming is bad for climate change, because it yields less than non-organic.
This week heralded an all too familiar event in the UK Parliament - a House of Commons debate on the badger cull. With the second year of culling having very recently completed, politicians and animal lovers alike are eagerly awaiting the news of just how many badgers were killed over the last six weeks in Gloucestershire and Somerset.
A farmer on BBC4's PM programme on Thursday September 24 said that the European Commission's two-year partial ban on three
Badgers are our largest surviving carnivore and have lived in our landscape for over half million years. Some badger setts in our countryside are over 500 years old and date back to the Elizabethan era. However our relationship with this iconic species has often been savage and cruel.
David invited us to his farm to video the tragic events unfolding. The result is an emotionally charged yet shocking video. We make no apologies for that. This is the distressing reality that farmers like David are having to face as bovine TB continues to devastate farming families across large parts of the country.
HS2 raises the prospect of an unacceptable treble hit. Firstly, essential farmland is being lost to the line; secondly, larger areas which have been highlighted for habitat creation and tree planting will take valuable food-producing land out of production. And thirdly, far more new habitat is being imposed than is being lost on a questionable 'bigger is better' principle.