niqab

I agree with our senior politicians that it is a professional issue: it should be a woman's choice and it is un-British to think of banning this in public.
Unless people are committing a crime or outraging public decency they can wear what they like. Other than that, no-one should be telling people what to wear. Difficulties arise when there are no precise rulings or new situations arise...
I am definitely against the niqab for a variety of reasons: Many people see it as a visual proof of subordination of females. People in the United Kingdom see it as a rejection of British culture and refusal to integrate. One is tempted to ask why they don't choose to live in an Islamic country and enjoy their Hijabs and Niqabs unhindered and unnoticed.
In recent days the niqab - a facial veil worn by some Muslim women - has once again become the subject of intense media attention. The latest reincarnation of this issue began several weeks ago when a Muslim defendant refused to remove the headwear standing trial at Blackfriars Crown Court...
Give me one good reason why a woman shouldn't be allowed to cover her face in public if that's what she wants to do. You don't object to her covering her buttocks, do you, or her breasts? Do you find it offensive if a woman wears sunglasses? And anyway, what's it got to do with you?
Just a few weeks after the public outcry about Miley Cyrus 'twerking' in a 'nude' bikini at the MTV Video Awards the last two weeks have seen a similar public outcry gaining apace about the wearing - or more precisely the banning - of the face veil worn by Muslim women... In both settings it is interesting how gender has been played out, in particular the role of men within them.
There's a palpable streak of narcissism among British-born niqab-wearers. In certain Islamic countries, the full face veil has the effect of making women anonymous. In Britain, it has the opposite effect: it makes you stand out from the crowd and turns you into an object of intrigue.
Liberal Democrat Jeremy Browne's call for a national debate into banning the veil is yet another show of religious intolerance and disrespect for freedom of choice. Taking away the right for a Muslim woman who chooses to wear the face veil on her own accord is not giving anyone the freedom to choose how they practice their faith.
We live in a pluralist society: I don't want anyone to lecture me about the way I choose to live my life: in return, I won't lecture them.
We're not always going to understand everything straight away and we don't always need to, celebrate difference and appreciate the fact that it exists in Britain. To live in a tolerant society is not to stamp down but it's to be able to accept those exact things when they're not harming you.