no makeup selfie

Since the dawn of social media, citizens of the social space have been exposed to an ever-increasing number of causes and movements. This in turn has helped to propagate the notion of 'slacktivism', the perception - arguably the delusion - that you can effect change without really doing anything at all.
Luisa Zissman has finally joined the likes of Helen Flanagan and Michelle Keegan as one of the celebs to share a #NoMakeUpSelfie
In a world where everyone is so busy and constantly on the go, it's very rare that we get to stop and think about the things that are important to us. Last week, it was refreshing to see a campaign which cut through the noise and saw people come together to take action for a very worthy cause.
Tell me I'm overreacting if you want, but I'm not a fan of any trend that makes people feel worse about their body image, no matter how much money it raises. Let's stop selling out our sisters and disregarding their thoughts and feelings, and instead start doing something productive to raise awareness.
As we now know, the #nomakeupselfie originally started in solidarity to actress Kim Novak who was shamed by commentators for her looks. Entirely separate from cancer and from charity, it remained a brazen, slightly chipped middle finger to our image obsessed world.
A victim of a vicious nightclub attack has used the #nomakeupselfie trend to raise thousands of pounds for a rape crisis
Michelle Keegan has defended herself on Twitter after critics claimed she had lied about not wearing makeup in a recent selfie
What do you think the opposite sex finds attractive in you? If you're a guy, do you think that women prefer bulging muscles and washboard abs? Or, if you're a woman, maybe you think men prefer skinny girls, like the ones we see on the catwalk? If so, you're likely mistaken.
Today, we're leading with Aaron Eccles, head of social media of Cancer Research and how they turned around a meme that wasn't even theirs and have raised £8m so far off the back of it. We've then got comedy legend Ruby Wax with a fantastic post on how to use mindfulness as an internal weathervane to predict depression...
When the selfies first started appearing in our Cancer Research UK newsfeeds, a few of our supporters got in touch on Facebook and Twitter to ask if we'd started the campaign. We tweeted that it wasn't ours but that we appreciated the sentiment, and we directed people to our website if they wanted to get involved with our work to beat cancer sooner. Less than 12 hours later, we'd been retweeted hundreds of times and we were seeing more and more selfies appearing from people saying they were doing it for us. We knew we needed to act fast so we took a picture of a team member without makeup holding a sign with our text to donate code.