Nobel Peace Prize

Today, history is made. Malala Yousafzai becomes the youngest ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, standing shoulder to shoulder with illustrious Laureates past Nelson Mandela, Aung San Suu Kyi and Mother Theresa.
But things took a turn for the Kanye when the ceremony was interrupted by a man waving a Mexican flag. Members of security
As Malala Yousafzai prepared to formally receive her Nobel Peace Prize, the gender gap in the Nobel sphere was on our minds
The Street Camel of News It's been a good week for broken ground. UKIP, after nearly twenty years as an entity, finally won
In a world that's ever engaged in plotting cross-border terrorism, loading its guns and aiming missiles across countries peace does not stand a chance. In fact, often you wonder about the probability of nations being friends with each other, all through this mayhem.
The International Day of the Girl Child recognises the specific barriers faced by girls globally that inhibit their potential to act in and shape the world around them, and Malala is a perfect example for us. She is a girl, yes. But she is not helpless. She is a survivor, not ours to save. She is her own advocate.
The young Afghan Malala Yousafzai's winning of the Nobel Peace Prize last week gained worldwide attention, while John O'Keefe's Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine was a particular source of national pride in the UK.
Despite the announcement of the Nobel Peace Prize being awarded to two people this year, the Internet still seems to be solely focused on Malala's achievement, whilst almost completely ignoring the fact that Kailash has done a lot of impressive work himself (evidently so, if he's been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for it).
Naomi Campbell meant it as a sweet gesture, and it can probably be blamed on the iPhone's autocorrect, so we probably shouldn't
Malala accepting the Nobel peace prize Speaking after finishing the school day at Edgbaston High School for Girls in Birmingham