Non-Communicable Diseases

The basics of good health are widely known. Eat well. Don't chew or smoke tobacco. Pay attention to hygiene and the environment
Isabel Torres has worked in the pharmaceutical industry for nearly 20 years and is the Global Head of Access to Medicine at Takeda Pharmaceuticals. Last week, Takeda hosted the 'Blueprint for Success' summit in Geneva - bringing together experts from government, industry, NGOs, foundations, academia, finance and the wider business world to explore how new partnerships and innovation can improve access to medicine for patients around the world.
Meanwhile, technological and organisational innovations as well as sustained, co-ordinated efforts across multiple stakeholders are required. The healthcare infrastructure developed to address Millennium Development Goals can be leveraged to face the NCD challenge.
As the Syrian conflict enters its sixth year Age International and our partners are stepping up work among older refugees
Long-term diseases are the leading cause of death in the UK - according to the Office of National Statistics (ONS), in 2013 there were over 360,000 deaths from long-term (chronic) diseases in England and Wales. That's 72 per cent of all registered deaths that year. Around 8 per cent of these deaths are caused by just one disease: COPD.
Monday is United Nations' World Health Day, where those of us working to improve the health of people across the globe traditionally deliver a clarion call to galvanise people into action. It's a moment when, to paraphrase Kofi Annan, we remind world governments that health is to be seen not as a blessing to be wished for, but as a human right to be fought for.
The concept of mHealth is nothing new. Smartphones, apps and wearable devices are already successfully helping people to quit smoking, lose weight, manage their diabetes and track activity, such as running and walking.
Think of disease in Africa and you maybe think of malaria. But this is not the whole picture. In Africa and across developing countries, people are living longer and their lifestyles are changing. With this shift, a different threat is emerging...
Let us at least recognize the magnitude of the problem and pay tribute to those braving cancers and others serious conditions on World Cancer Day while we continue with our struggle to fight health systems challenges and raise awareness about prevention.
When we think of health problems in Africa, we generally focus on infectious diseases (such as HIV and malaria), malnutrition, and maternal and childhood mortality. By contrast, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as obesity, heart disease and cancer are frequently referred to as 'diseases of affluence', and thus thought only as a problem of rich, developed countries.