Norman Lamb

Lamb rebutted that he had pushed for greater access to services for mental health patients as those with physical ailments
While making PrEP available is ultimately a decision for NHS England, rather than for politicians, I hope they will take steps to make PrEP available to people considered to be at high risk of catching the virus, without further delay. This could have an enormous impact on the lives of countless numbers of people in high-risk groups and be a vast improvement on our current approach, which wastes NHS resources and has let down far too many people.
I know from personal experience just how vital good mental health care is for families across the UK. One in four people experience poor mental health at some time in their lives and this means that everyone knows somebody who has had a mental health problem. Yet for far too long our society has not prioritised mental health care. For decades, it has been at the back of the queue for funding and the front of the queue for cuts.
More than 200 high-profile public figures have signed an open letter urging the Government to spare mental health spending
The truth is that there is outrageous discrimination at the heart of the NHS. If you have suspected cancer you have a right to see a specialist within two weeks - and rightly so. But if you are a teenager with an eating disorder - a condition which can kill - you have no such right. It's impossible to justify that.
I am a big fan of Tim Farron. I have been since long before he became party president, let alone party leader. I hope he heeds the wisdom of his one-time rival and gives us the answer we really need to hear.
As I write this article, I am on the Eurostar from London St Pancras to Brussels. You might think this a strange diversion in the final week of my campaign to become leader of the Liberal Democrats. But today's trip is at the very heart of why I want to lead our party. Because whether we are a party of eight MPs or 208, we cannot hope to address so many of the challenges we face as a society on our own. The great threats of the coming decade - global climate change, mass migration, international economic upheaval, and a deteriorating security situation - are international challenges, requiring international solutions.
Britain has become less collective, citizens and consumers feel more empowered and many individual rights - through equal marriage for instance - are better recognised. But - and this is the bad news - much of our economy, society and politics remains thoroughly illiberal and conservative.
In the Liberal Democrats, it's not the leader who sets policy, it's the membership. But I reckon it's not unreasonable for leadership candidates to set out their own views, and to call for a rethink where they believe the party's got it wrong on any particular policy. And I think we have got it wrong on fracking.
The Lib Dems seem quite a tough lot. While it is impossible to ignore the gravity of the electoral crisis which has clobbered the party at all levels since Nick Clegg led it into coalition with the Tories in 2010, Britain without a Liberal party would be an alien place... So what is going on: and will it make any difference who wins?