normcore

I enjoy working trends into my own wardrobe (seriously, who could resist the teeny-tiny but otherwise totally practical cross-body bags this summer?), but what ever happened to good old-fashioned (pardon the pun) style? Why can't we dress for ourselves?
I don't care about normcore, metrosexuality, spornosexuality, or even lumbersexuality (yes, now even the bearded, flannel shirt-clad hipster that has his own label). The last label to be put past me was 'dad-core' (suppose that's just normcore taken to a whole new level, right?).
Fashion is still buzzing with the idea of 'Normcore' - a trend cemented by Kim Kardashian's appearance on the cover of Vogue. Suddenly the emphasis has shifted from supermodel to reality star; chiffon to denim; effort to effortless.
So I hear that one of this season's celebrity trends is 'Normcore'. This fascinating departure from glamour is to be 'deliberately ordinary' in how you present yourself. You might have nondescript, untidy hair and possibly a rather anonymous pair of glasses.
Rather than trying to be different with what you wear, you try to be 'ardently ordinary' or 'endearingly awkward', and, for a character rarely seen out of his zip- up polyester cardigan and sweat pants, it means Derek is not just riding a Normcore wave, he's the king of the movement.
How to dress normcore, let me break it down: no-name, unflattering, comfortable jeans, boring unfashionable warm jacket, plain tee, plain white socks, trainers, etc. If you've mastered the look, it should be hard to tell from behind if you are a 50-something executive or just taking a break from backpacking in Nepal.