Novels

Packed with hilarious scenes that had me laughing out loud, Losing It is an easy to read book that is hard to put down. Wrapped in this brilliant comedy is the more serious change made by the protagonist, Millie, who loses some of her criticalness of others and herself, which perhaps is an important element of Helen Lederer's new 'Mid-Lit' genre as it is in mid-life.
I'm very grateful for all the gadgets mankind has invented - many of which were speculated in the minds of the Science Fiction visionaries (Trekkies do love their Bluetooth headphones, oh and flip-phones), I am however more than miffed some of my favourites didn't make it.
Emma Healey has had a roller coaster six months: her debut novel Elizabeth Is Missing, which sold for a six-figure advance, was published last summer to critical acclaim. And last week the twenty-nine year old writer won the Costa First Novel award and is now up against the likes of Ali Smith and Kate Saunders for the Costa Book of the Year Prize.
The YouTube sensation Zoella didn't actually write her best-selling debut novel - at least, not on her own - it has been
Writers often hide behind a pen name or keep the very act of writing a secret from colleagues, friends or family. But what is it about writing that makes writers want to hide from view?
My favourite health and fitness app measures how many steps I've taken each day and how deeply (or- most often- not) I've slept each night. It calculates the balance of the calories I've consumed, and gives me a helpful nudge if I've had too much salt, sugar or saturated fat. It sets me targets, and gives me a virtual pat on the back if I meet or even exceed them.
Writers! Thinking of putting a sex passage (as it were) in your novel? You might want to think again - thanks to the timely
Once all the noise has died down, which of this year's debuts will really stand the test of time? Who are the authors with long and successful careers ahead of them? Which are the truly standout first novels of 2014? Here are seven I think are genuinely unmissable.
I set myself two goals after my husband and I got married back in 2007: have a baby and get a UK book deal. But a few years down the line, neither had happened. Then guess what? It all happened at once.
Writers are frequently told that they should work every day in order to build and maintain the requisite muscles. Great advice, but what exactly should we be writing? To be specific, if you are committed to the art of fiction, does writing non-fiction 'count'?
Benjamin remembers some of the books he has collected over the years. He recalls ordering books from catalogues - which are essentially the Amazon of the first half of the twentieth century - and waiting eagerly for their arrival.
Education secretary Michael Gove's controversial announcement American fiction is to be sidelined in the new English Literature
"Writing advertising copy, which I learned largely from the great David Ogilvy, taught me not to waffle, and to use facts instead of purple prose when describing something," says Peter Mayle over a glass of red.
We started this. That's what I can't help thinking every time I hear about the latest death and suffering in Syria. When the US and Britain invaded Iraq in 2003, we set off a chain of events that led inexorably to the killing fields of Damascus and Aleppo.
When I was first starting out as a published author, and before my first book was published, a famous writer at an awards
In the process from script to screen sacrifices have to be made. One of the scenes we were all delighted with was a ménage a trois where a woman ends up in bed with one man dressed as the Bristol Rovers pirate and the other as Bristol City's confusingly-named mascot Scrumpy the Robin. Unfortunately neither football club would give us permission to desecrate their poor mascots.
Lights in the sky are one thing, near misses quite another, and as much as the MOD is happy to publicise the dubious (and often humorous) reports from members of the public, they aren't nearly as forthcoming as to remind us that the National Air Traffic Control Services detect around one unidentified flying object every month.
Peter May is a writer who needs no introduction. An award winning journalist at the age of twenty-one, he left newspapers for a career in television and screenwriting, creating three prime-time drama serials, including 1978's The Standard.
At the hospital bedside of Patrick, a 50-year-old professor of American studies, drinker and womaniser, our narrator begins to detail the transformative days that follow shortly after his heart transplant.
It's a good job Forrest Reid didn't write to be famous. Almost seventy years after his death, his novels gather dust in libraries: unthumbed and unadmired. Highly thought of by friends like E.M. Forster and Walter de la Mare during his lifetime, the Ulster writer has since fallen into obscurity. Until now, that is.