obesity epidemic

If Theresa May really wanted to tackle the "burning injustices" in society, sorting out the food epidemic in Britain from soil to plate should have been a priority. Instead, we are left with a Prime Minister who was able to identify and commentate on a social truth, but when given the opportunity to put things right, presented the public with a manifesto that perpetuated injustice, punished the poor and ignored the modern scourge of malnutrition now becoming the norm in 21st Century Britain.
There's a devastating epidemic spreading across the world that is being ignored by world leaders. One that, since the 1980s
Any public health measure must always consider the financial impact of action. But it is simply misleading to talk about possible financial impact of a measure without also talking about the economic burden we are already facing. The economic argument for action is huge - £27billion a year. That's why we can't afford not to introduce the soft drinks industry levy.
Most of us don't know what an appropriate portion should look like and, following today's article in the BBC, we're under-reporting the amount of calories we eat by almost one-third. Apart from the 80g portion of fruit and vegetables we should eat a day, there are no official UK guidelines on portion sizes. With this in mind, here is my easy guide for understanding portion sizes and it's based on a simple tool - your hand!
I must admit, I get increasingly frustrated with some of the reports I read in our papers these days. Take a recent article
As a dietitian, the challenge is to educate people on healthier food choices, activity and lifestyle changes. Doing this in clinic on a one to one basis is excellent and, provided you have enough time, you can really drill down and identify the changes that need to be made.
Britain has now joined Mexico and France in taxing businesses when they compromise the health of our children. I don't believe it's anti-business. In the UK, kids and teenagers' single largest source of sugar is from sugary sweetened drinks and with one-third of kids overweight or obese, these statistics cannot be taken lightly anymore. Of course, industry totally disagree - what they all agree on is personal responsibility and self-regulation, and look where that got us. The announcement of a sugary drinks tax has sent ripples around the world, especially in countries where they're also struggling with childhood obesity.
Sugar is and will always be a treat, just like a glass of wine or the occasional cigarette but when there are equally bad effects on the health then surely its time that we call a cut on the amount that we consume. It may taste sweet initially, but the long term effects which aren't being showed to us should make you feel bitter.
You may only have thought acute conditions like anorexia, bulimia and binge eating were eating disorders. You'd be wrong. Constant, drastic dieting is not normal behaviour and many experts now consider it is one of the major factors contributing towards the obesity epidemic. A diet is really disordered eating.
Obesity is not just about being fat. It raises the risk of many health problems including diabetes, cancer, heart disease and stroke. Obesity threatens to have parents outlive their children and there is a very real concern that it could bankrupt the National Health Service (NHS).