occupy movement

Anti-capitalist protesters said they had "fulfilled" a goal when they moved into Paternoster Square, home to the London Stock
A controversial new housekeeping service in the conservative depths of Texas has caught the attention of local police, despite
Why should Occupy be different to any other organisation where mixed agendas struggle to get to the top of the pile? There are people who through sheer force of personality will have a stronger voice, a winning argument. Occupy is no different from the real world.
When I first started visiting the Occupy London camps at St Paul's and Finsbury Square, what struck me most were the mixed messages. The camps are not short of creative people who come up with dozens of different slogans. But therein lies the problem for me.
Occupy's St Paul's camp is no more. It was evicted in the early hours of 28 February - and now that it has gone, it's so much easier to see the value to Occupy of the camp and its location.
People are angry and are no longer the blind, flag-waving serfs we are expected to be by the governing elite. Contrary to Cameron, Unite's proposal to co-opt the games is patriotism personified and whether or not the strike will be executed, its proposition is something most should be getting behind. Given that sick and vulnerable patients will lie stranded in ambulances whilst a cavalcade of sponsors, dignitaries speed by in their Mercs along one of the VIP lanes, London's transport system is already pretty screwed, strike or no strike.
In the early hours of 28 February 2012, the bailiffs and the police moved in on the Occupy LSX camp at St Paul's Cathedral. Several small skirmishes and several arrests later, the camp is gone. I was not there - I am not a news photographer - but I do feel a sort of sadness.
The City of London police have carried out illegal evictions before in a futile attempt to stem the Occupy movement, but the sinister pre-dawn demolition of the school building shows the government getting more desperate to end the extra-parliamentary movements against forced austerity.
The most benign of the viewers' emails and texts being read out on Sky News and the BBC during and in the immediate aftermath of the occupation were expressing variations on a belief that the eviction was the appropriate course of action because the protest proved itself inefficacious.
As the world's most influential leaders gather this week in Davos it is clear that much of the world is looking on, whether from igloos immediately outside or further afield, with a certain degree of hostility towards business and, more specifically, big businesses.
In the middle of the large, two-room communal tent, old, donated pieces of furniture form a circle for a meeting. The atmosphere
It's cold in the Occupation Records office - a UBS-owned building on Sun Street, now occupied by the activities of Occupy London. I drag myself out of the warmth of my bed - a half deflated air mattress and a bundle of sleeping bags - and reach for my phone whose ring has demanded I get up.
Something is wrong with a system, which can be influenced by externals groups and individuals. Unions, corporations and private individuals are able to undermine the true nature of a representative democracy by the lobbying system.
No foresight could have predicted such a consequential and momentous year. At the time of writing this, it is review galore for journalists and the public alike with a myriad of comparisons being made between 2011 and other significant years in history.
I have been following developments at the Occupy camp in London from the beginning, occasionally in person, more often as
By all accounts we could be two or three years into what is already being called 'The Lost Decade'. Disruption, the like of which we saw this summer, will not help the UK address the real challenge we face - how to compete with emerging nations and how to secure our future.
Toby Veck, the central character of Charles Dickens' The Chimes, stood all day long just outside a church-door and waited
The global economy is in "a devil of a mess" according to Ken Clarke, UK Justice Secretary. hank you Ken, we already knew. And we know that none of you in government have the foggiest clue how to put it right.
I SPY: great game, popular with kids on long journeys; occupies the mind; but not much fun played on your own. Twice lately
Around 200 anti-capitalist protesters entered Parliament Square as they linked with a group supporting activists who had