occupy

Artists are the most powerful people in our societies. They influence public opinion. They make culture. The define our reality. Donating money's nice. But if artists want to really make an impact, they need to be on the front lines.
Fifty-two days after the main Umbrella Movement 'occupy' camp was cleared, Hong Kong protesters returned to the streets on Sunday for a pro-democracy rally. Organisers say 13,000 took part, whilst police estimated that 6,600 were present.
Police dismantled the final umbrella movement protest encampment in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong on Tuesday morning. Traffic was restored around lunchtime as police made 20 arrests. After 79 days of protest, pro-democracy demonstrators were given 30 minutes to pack up and leave. Most left the area, but around 17 people remained at a sit-in awaiting arrest.
A day after one of Hong Kong's three pro-democracy protest camps was cleared by police and bailiffs, hundreds of pro-democracy activists returned to Mong Kok's main shopping thoroughfare on Thursday evening. Instead of erecting tents, activists convened to collectively watch movie trailers and adverts on a cinema billboard.
At least 80 people were arrested, according to police, as part of one of Hong Kong's pro-democracy protest camps was cleared on Tuesday. Bailiffs were on site to enforce a court order to clear obstructions from a relatively small part of the encampment on the Kowloon Peninsula. Most of the clearance was performed by an agency with bailiffs and police on hand to assist.
Dozens of protesters gathered at the British consulate in Hong Kong on Friday demanding that Britain does more to prevent China influencing elections in the city.
Protesters who spent the night near Parliament Square today said they planned to remain outside the Supreme Court until Sunday
Pro-democracy protesters descended on central London tonight as the Occupy movement gathered to set up camp outside Parliament
The idea of trickle-down economics, the zeitgeist of monetarism and the bug-bear of the left is dead as an idea. It's nonsensical and it never worked.
The main Umbrella Movement 'Occupy' site in Hong Kong received an unusual visitor, on Friday, in the form of a Kim Jong-Un impersonator.
Real democracy is messy, like the Houses of Parliament is rocky and uneven; an organic structure in the Gothic style... It should not be made clean, and it should not be made smooth. Winston Churchill, for one, was not afraid of the fight. And neither, one may hope, are #OccupyDemocracy.
Our labour is worth just the same as anyone else's. Don't let society carve into to stone what we know to be wrong by allowing this opinion to go unchallenged...
At eighteen minutes past six on Sunday evening, as soon as the Sun had set, police closed in to break up a group of peaceful
Hundreds of police officers, many in riot gear, swooped into Hong Kong's Mong Kok Occupy encampment in the early hours of this morning. Police and street cleaners removed barricades and tents, leaving pro-democracy protesters restricted a smaller area of Nathan Rd in Kowloon, occupying the southbound side only.
We're not interested in winding back the clock. We don't see the world as an epic struggle between capital and labour. And we don't have all the answers. Yet. What we do see is people being disempowered. And not just by the government. What marks out the political discourse of my generation is that we have organised against any power which negatively impacts our lives.
It was 6am when the lights came on and Rage Against the Machine started playing through the speakers in the University of Sheffield's Richard Roberts lecture hall. About 50 students from across Sheffield, including activists from the Autonomous Students Network, the Living Wage Campaign, the Revolutionary Socialists Society and others occupied the building at 7pm on Wednesday October 30, the night before the planned staff strikes...
I'm not advocating taking a torch to your local bank branch in California, but if you're going to face thirteen years for drawing with chalk, objectively, it makes more since to make sure the building is empty of people and just burn the bank down. That, more than anything, should show the absurdity of the charges these activists are facing and the creeping authoritarianism of the state.
Over the last few months we've seen a significant rise in student activism at British universities. Prompted by the anti-privatisation 'Occupy Sussex' protest, students around the country have sought to influence the managers of their institutions in increasingly visible ways.
These are interesting times in Turkey, times in which an open conversation, although often unforgiving, is taking place between factions who have long disliked each other, politically speaking.
Today the issue of economic justice is among the most polarizing and provocative we have. Watching the arguments for and against is often like bloodsport. Is the level of inequality an accurate measure of a country's success? Are bankers or socialists the enemy?