Official Charts

In those 10 years, he produced 11 albums - Hunky Dory, The Rise & Fall Of Ziggy Stardust & The Spiders From Mars, Aladdin Sane, Pin-Ups, Diamond Dogs, Young Americans, Station To Station, Low, Heroes, Lodger, Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps) - many of which stand comparison with any albums of any era. And, as a result, more than a dozen will find themselves in the Official Albums Top 100 today.
It's a rare thing in your working life to find yourself handling history. I suspect those working on the new Harper Lee novel To Set A Watchman feel that way right now. It's hard to imagine a more highly anticipated book launch. And, here at the Official Charts, it has been a rather remarkable 12 months. Just a year ago, audio streams were ushered into the Official Singles Chart for the first time. I know, it's just been 12 months. Crazy isn't it? Then, in February, streams were reflected for the first time in the Official Albums Chart...
Streaming is upon us, it is one of the buzz words of our era - and understandably so. It may remain a minority sport among music fans (around 12% of spending on music in the UK during 2014), but it is growing at a rapid pace.
There is a significant difference about this year's race however - an historic difference, truth be told. For 62 years, the Official Christmas number one has been decided on the basis of sales alone. This year, the race reflects the changing way that music fans are consuming music.
Ernie Harburg is the son of the late Yip Harburg - the lyricist of "DIng Dong! The Witch Is Dead" (and all the songs in the "Wizard Of Oz") - and President of the Yip Harburg Foundation. He has released a statement passed on through Ian Baldry, the creator of the facebook campaign to make the track number one.
'Ding Dong The Witch Is Dead' has failed to reach number one, after an online campaign by opponents of late former prime
'Les Miserables' star Anne Hathaway looks set for her first chart hit after her version of 'I Dreamed A Dream' from the film
The first time many of us will have seen the shiny little five inch disc was on Tomorrow's World, a year before the format's launch, when Kieran Prendiville spread strawberry jam on a Bee Gees CD and told us all that it would still play. It didn't.