Ogilvy & Mather

So, next week the Scots will decide if they want to be independent. Let me start by declaring a lack of interest in this issue. A complete lack of interest. I think may be one-eighth Scottish but I really don't care if I have Scottish blood coursing through my veins. It hasn't affected my life either way.
Next year, after the General Election, how many of the new Cabinet will be qualified to become ministers of government? What, for example, if a deal has to be done with Ukip? Will these appointments be made on merit or political expediency? Or will these people have been grown, nurtured, into their jobs? I think we know the answer.
If Edwin Brock had been thirty years younger than me rather than thirty years older than me, would I have advised him to earn his crust by writing advertising copy at the behest of people like me? The heck I would.
"Writing advertising copy, which I learned largely from the great David Ogilvy, taught me not to waffle, and to use facts instead of purple prose when describing something," says Peter Mayle over a glass of red.
"The consumer isn't a moron; she is your wife." So said David Ogilvy, the man who founded the company I work for. It's a memorable quote, in no small part for the way it reveals attitudes of his time (it appears in his book, Confessions of An Advertising Man, first published in 1963.)
In this sense, within the space of my career, marketing has gone from nothing to everything. That's some journey.