older workers

If ever proof were needed that it is not possible to "have cake and eat it" over the EU, here it is. I refer to the revelations last week about the details of migrant controls (in a leaked Home Office paper) which prompted business concerns at the "catastrophic" consequences for employee recruitment in a range of sectors.
Everyone seems to agree, a skilled and trained workforce is a pre-requisite for a successful economy. New skills and training are good for individuals too.
The UK state pension age (SPA) could increase to 70 by as early as 2057 if the government follows the recommendations set
If we are to contribute to the workforce in healthy ways that fairly recognises and rewards our talents and potential, surely parents shouldn't be penalised for dipping out of employment and suffer the longer term impact on their employability.
Today's Annual Report from the Chief Medical Officer tackles a subject close to our hearts - how to help the 'baby boomer' generation age well. As the CMO points out, people aged 50-70 are a large and diverse group: over 35% of the population are over 50 and the median age is already 40.
Though most other "isms" were piled on the ballot scales at some point in the USA Presidential election, ageism never seemed much of a factor with the electorate. Perhaps this was because both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were well beyond what we still laughingly call, "normal retirement age".
The reviews of I, Daniel Blake, have already made Director Ken Loach's case for an Oscar, but if such a thing existed, the film would merit an award for critically explaining an aspect of public policy - in this case, the UK's welfare to work system. While Loach's insight into the condition of the poor in twenty-first century Britain speaks for itself, the policy background is less familiar.
People born in the early 1980s have almost half the average median household wealth of those born a decade earlier, according
The dice falls unevenly and the inequalities in society could hardly be more vividly expressed than in the health and dignity of older people in later life. Not all the years of extra life we are enjoying will be in good health.
British society, Japanese society - the super ageing workforce will demand common sense liberal measures in both cases. We can learn a lot by considering how other people do things, despite our cultural differences - or maybe because of them.