olympic legacy

As the Rio 2016 Olympic Games enthral the world in Brazil, thoughts in the UK are turning to the legacy of our own Games in London 2012. And with the attention comes the inevitable criticism from those disappointed that the transformations they dreamed of - in the economy and prospects of people in East London, or in sports participation - have not come about, or at least not in the way they had wanted.
Maybe it's because it seemed like there was so much sport between us and it over the past year - world cups in rugby union and Twenty20, the Euros, Wimbledon - but the Rio Games seemed in a permanent state of far-away-ness, but now the opening ceremony is this week.
It's no surprise that students who are estranged are at a greater disadvantage then those with supportive families. All in all, I want my society to help make the lives of estranged students at MMU a little easier, and make the MMU community a more estrangement-friendly place. And if I can manage that, then I'll be happy...
Summer 2012. A group of athletes from an area of sport previously only followed by die-hards and sporting hipsters burst
I am a bit of a cynic about the human and social aspects of events legacy. Energy and promise is concentrated at the planning stage. Legacy forums proliferate and good intentions blossom in the run up to events. Then after the big bang of the event there is a black hole. A better word than legacy for what so often happens might be 'pregacy'...
Parts of this area, which less than a generation ago was one of the poorest regions in Western Europe, now has some of the highest land values in the world; of course, they are not occupied by the same families. Poverty hasn't been eliminated or even reduced. It has been relocated.
London City Airport sits in the heart of London's famous Royal Docks. The airport of the Square Mile residing in one of London's poorest communities has always struck me as a tad peculiar.
There is no guarantee that basketball would have become the next British Cycling even with funding but you can't just assume that the only value of a sport is to bring success at an international level. There's so much more to it than that.
Over two million British children live in families who can't afford a trip to the seaside... we like to run day trips and camps to classy events and venues that disadvantaged teenagers are otherwise very unlikely to get near. The latest of these is the residential camp we've set up in Glasgow across the Commonwealth Games.
I don't want to claim that community sports aren't facing real difficulties with regard to funding and keeping local facilities open, but it is worth publicising those events where local people are continuing to get involved in mass participation events, despite all the controversial funding issues. These events are also showing even the most cynical of commentators, that even after the lucrative advertising opportunities that the Olympics created have disappeared, corporate business and sponsors are still putting effort and resources into getting communities and young people interested in sport.