olympic legacy

Britain's Personal Best campaign is aiming to keep the 2012 Olympic spirit alive by mobilising people to push themselves to do better in any part of their lives; and our call is for the public to help us by using, improving and protecting their local environments.
year on from the London Games there's much talk about the legacy of 2012. If you visit Beijing you'll be able to take advantage of the infrastructural improvements made ahead of the Games. The city's public transport system underwent major modernisation and expansion ahead of 2008 Games, in order to cope with up to 19 million passengers a day.
The phrase 'Olympic legacy' has been reverberating around the ears of every British citizen, and by now it is beginning to make a bit of a racket. And as we arrive at the one year anniversary of what was an awe-inspiring event and survey the scene, everyday inhabitants of this fantastic island are forced to question the reality of said legacy.
The Games, "Our Games". are like an iceberg, it's only when you look a bit deeper do you see the real size of what truly exists. We should celebrate our Anniversary Games. The London 2012 Games were a special moment in our lifetime and, yes, they were worth it!
With Britain's Personal Best we are building on how inspired the UK felt after London 2012. It is a call for each and every one of us to dig deep and find something amazing that shows us at our own personal best. Whatever our age, ability or resources. It's about helping each other and ourselves, taking on a challenge that is intellectual, sporting, artistic, healthy or just plain scary.
It's a bit 'last year' in 2013 to talk up 2012 but, as we approach the first anniversary of the London Olympics, there's good evidence that 2012 has changed what the world thinks about us.
The government has claimed a new shopping centre in Croydon as evidence of the Olympic 'legacy'. The arrival of Westfield
A total of £5.3 million of Lottery money which helped build the Olympic Park is being reused to back grassroots sports and
The exposure women's football gets in the UK has been poor, to say the least. It was only due to a campaign last year that led to the Women's World Cup quarter final being upgraded from the Red Button to an airing on BBC2 instead of a planned repeat of Porridge and an episode of Flog It!
The London 2012 Olympic Games didn't take place in Stratford. Perhaps this was something you cottoned on to quite some time ago. Or perhaps you didn't then, nor now, give a shit. Either way, as a local resident living in the shadow of the athlete's village, I'm still waiting.