online activism

Followers would constantly ask me how I got to be so comfortable in my own skin. Which of course, to an extent, I am. But what they wouldn't see, beyond the posts and the hashtags, were my anxiety attacks. The physical pain that the thought of leaving my bedroom would bring.
Oh look, Twitter have been making changes. As is usual with Twitter (and, let's face it, many tech companies) the changes have, for some at least, made the site more annoying and clunky. But it isn't the improvements that bother me, or indeed many people.
While our Prime Minister may well be female, the very foundation of Parliament remains male-centric, as the vast majority of MPs are, and always have been, men. I'm talking a solid 71%. A record low. No, that wasn't a typo. That's worrying.
To combat everyday sexism, we need to raise awareness and change social attitudes so behaviours become socially unacceptable and people are held accountable for their interactions online.
This power is now in our hands, or more precisely, at our fingertips. In sharing and commenting on these articles and petitions, we have begun to do away with the idea that we are unable to help or to change things.
Apparently we can't have a sensible discussion about anything without it descending into accusations of bigotry, blindness to privilege or just plain old childish nastiness. Unlike many criticisms leveled against feminism, this is probably one those inside the movement can accept.
In the absence of a structure connecting the Movement's grassroots with its highest branches, the Five Star Movement may end up losing its intrinsic bond with the citizens and, therefore, its appeal as an innovative political force.
There was an in-depth look at global campaigning movement Avaaz in Sunday's Observer. Its founder, Ricken Patel, was interviewed about how it builds movements online to secure change. It was a generally fascinating piece, but the headline was bothersome to me...
If bashing equality-seeking movements is your thing, you'll already be down with the failings of feminism. Exclusionary, ineffective and irrelevant, we're a middle class movement which bolted the drawing-room doors against the masses as suffragettes, and has continued to alienate everybody with a load of intellectual blah-blah ever since.
Letting go and giving stakeholders a louder say in how things are run is now - paradoxically - a core component of staying in control for many large organisations, whether capitalist or communist, or a fashionably modern mixture of both.
The launch of the government's new "e-Petitions" website, which from Thursday allows the public to collect signatures online
On June 30 2011 activists held a protest outside the Department of Culture Media and Sport against the takeover of BSkyB