online journalism

In recent years, film critics have been the most pessimistic when it comes to the general public's change in attitudes towards traditional arts journalism.
Journalists everywhere should despair at how a commitment to storytelling with integrity was treated with such abandon. Frustratingly, the internet is full of readily accessible 'fail' videos, making it easy for journalists to go to YouTube, take down a copy of the video and run it.
Like any other online business, in order to to get ahead, newspapers are going to have to come up with an alternative business model and acknowledge that the old rules no longer apply. Methods such as developing content strategy, a strong online revenue system through building strong communities, social sharing, cross-platform branding and so on, are all going to be vital in the future.
A Harvard professor lectures on how whole industries have found it impossible to reinvent themselves in the face of technological revolution. He tells newspaper groups they will have to change almost everything in order to survive. Along comes his church (yes) and asks him to save their own 160-year-old daily paper. In a few short years, the professor becomes a media industry hero.
teve Jobs famously said "You have to start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology - not the other way round." Try doing this with Online Video. Sometimes you watch it because it's the best way to understand something (how to tie a bowtie), sometimes because it's the only option.
My advice to any company involved in the content land grab would be to find themselves an experienced sub, and do it quickly - before they all retrain and their indispensable talents are lost to us forever.
The online social media world remains "beyond regulation" the Leveson report has admitted. Describing the growth of blogs
So how is the tablet going to change the magazine world? Well, let me take you by the hand and walk you into a newsagent and show you five magazines with circulations of fewer than 20,000 that have advertising revenues of more than 50K.
Many felt the financial crisis of 2008 would bring a final death to mainstream news enterprises in developed media markets. They feared this would leave citizens in the hands of "pajama"-clad bloggers. "The Internet" was a threat to accountability journalism and its outcomes, which so many of us valued as integral to democracy. Except the story didn't play out that way.
The fact we were nibbling peanut butter on toast and reading the label on the Lurpack, not the Sunday supplements, should
I will let you in on a secret. In my email I have a list of many important headline-making science stories, but I'm not allowed
As the global news media shifts from pulp to digital, cries of "Stop the press!" seem destined to fade into golden, halcyon
When I said, with a glowing "Oh ho!", that The Huffington Post had asked me to blog for them, I received minimal "Oh ho" back. "Write about unpaid journalism," snarked my Twitterfeed, apparently confusing writing the odd piece with being put in a sweatshop and lashed until a Pulitzer came out.
Just the other day, I was attending an event, and a friendly and I think genuinely interested Fashion Editor asked me about my background and how I ended up as a blogger. Had she not been that pleasant, I would have given the usual "we come from Mars where we were made in a big machine". Instead, I gave her a brief summary of the past 10 years of my life. It seemed to answer her question, but it made me feel uneasy, like I had to justify myself.