online safety

We live in an age where there are just as many people looking to do you harm online as there are in real life and it's important for students to stay vigilant. While it's essential to enjoy their new home, they need to ensure their personal details are secure and that they're the only one that can truly 'find themselves' online.
So, perhaps, if you know what you're doing, having 4000 friends online may not be so bad after all - and if you're lucky, some of them may even be old English sheep dogs!
A survey of our specialist child sexual exploitation services last year showed how nearly two thirds of children groomed online who were referred to us were sexually exploited after meeting the attacker they met online.
'Tell your kids to let you know if anyone ever asks something like this.'
A dad is warning parents about the potential dangers of a popular app for young people after his seven-year-old daughter
In this digital age, it is becoming more and more difficult to track whether your kids are being safe online. Making sure your children know the dos and don'ts of the internet isn't as daunting as it may seem, and there are lots of tools and tricks out there to make your job even easier.
We can't see everything our kids are doing at all times; and it's something that if we tried to police, it would only build up resentment. Similarly, we can't ban the tech our children are using - it's about finding a balance, setting time limits and offering alternative activities to being online are good starting points.
Humans (moderators and innocent users) should never be asked to see harrowing and disturbing content. AI will make manual moderation a thing of the past and if this means letting the robots take our jobs then for once, this is surely a good thing.
Kym Marsh has vented her frustration online after learning that a fake Twitter account has been set up by someone pretending