online safety

With a wealth of gadgets available today, from tablets to games consoles to mobile phones, children are infinitely more tech-savvy than in years gone by - the average 13 year old has a far better grasp of the internet than most 40-somethings I know.
I've been in this situation myself. My daughter who is just seven years old loves to play with her mum's makeup and has tried to sneak out of the house wearing a dash of pink eyeshadow. Whilst it may just be her inquisitive nature and testing her boundaries, there's no doubt that she's growing up too quickly... Or attempting to.
Dating apps have revolutionised the way that we connect with other people, and new platforms are emerging and evolving at an incredible speed - each designed to offer us a fast and simple solution to finding love in the millennial age.
Lock the doors! Don't speak to strangers! We all remember the rules our parents set when we were young to help keep us safe. But which rules should we set when our children go online? Even though we've been practicing the art of parenting for thousands of years, when it comes to digital, we often feel clueless about how to protect our children.
Young people - who are both most exposed to the online world and the most vulnerable - need to be protected and shielded better than anyone. This education, between what is right and just and true, begins at home and in the school.
We are all human, and as Nev Schulman states, what people ultimately want is to find a connection. Unfortunately however, there are people out there that exploit this fundamental human trait.
Oh look, Twitter have been making changes. As is usual with Twitter (and, let's face it, many tech companies) the changes have, for some at least, made the site more annoying and clunky. But it isn't the improvements that bother me, or indeed many people.
Parents are being warned about spoof ‘Peppa Pig’ videos on YouTube with storylines of horror and death. A BBC investigation
Today, the workshops are up and running throughout Everton Football Club's communities. The goal of the project, if I can use that pun, is to educate young men to understand what healthy/appropriate relationships look like and then apply this learning to keeping safe online. Andy, who runs the workshops aided by the Everton Safeguarding Team, is not only an e-safety expert trainer, but also a Football Coach, so he's been able to make an immediate connection with all the young men participating.