Oppression

We live in a society where racial discrimination occurs routinely, but often subliminally. The discreet element of racism allows it to maintain its grip on society without people being able to fully appreciate its impact on the lives of many. Racism is not only demonstrated through hate crimes and openly racist remarks.
I believe in free speech and uphold Fury's right to say what he wants. I am less supportive of a public-funded body who choose to reinforce hate-filled views via an awards nomination but I am glad I have a right to respond.
Any questioning is effectively silenced with the labels 'whorephobic' or 'transphobic;' trans issues may be discussed only from a position of 'cis privilege' and the voices of a minority of individual sex workers override any structural criticism of the sex industry.
It seems we live in a climate where those being oppressed cannot even decide what amounts to oppression against them. We must wait to be told by someone from the oppressing class. That is convenient for the oppressing class, but an odd concept otherwise.
If anyone condemns any of my gay friends, or any person whom has a same sex preference, for their nature, that means that they are being discriminated against because not for what they do, but because of who they are. This is disgraceful. This is prejudicial. This is immoral. This is unacceptable.
Western governments have condemned Russia for the last seven months, drawing attention to her horrific human rights record and homophobic actions. However, there is nothing to make Russia pay any attention to these objections - why should she?
When Christ was on His mission trip to earth, He met the needs of the people before He preached, whether they were hungry or paralyzed, and He encourages us to do the same. Both C and B had good intentions however only one of them showed the fruit of their good intentions
When I was a first year undergraduate student, my psychology lecturer told me that Muslim women were complicit in their own repression and did not know what it was like to be liberated. As a student of humanities and social sciences I gauged that his views were conspicuously grounded in the litany of anecdotal sources cited by the media.
While I certainly agree that both men and women must recognise and escape the "confines of our gender", and that we need to acknowledge that we have all been ill-served by our culture's emphasis on certain gender stereotypes... I can't quite believe that it is truly down to women that men feel, well, emasculated.
Today the issue of economic justice is among the most polarizing and provocative we have. Watching the arguments for and against is often like bloodsport. Is the level of inequality an accurate measure of a country's success? Are bankers or socialists the enemy?