Paolo Di Canio

As has so often been proven, making pre-season predictions about league football is the most certain way for a journalist, blogger or pundit to make an absolute fool of themselves. Placing your words and reputation on the line before a ball has been kicked is, in 90% of cases, a true recipe for disaster.
Like the current extended summer we've experienced in the UK, the fate of Premier League managers appears to be undergoing a similar process. Any day now the temperature is sure to drop ten degrees and the first managerial departure is expected to arrive with it.
"It's not a very secure industry to be in at this moment in time," West Ham manager Sam Allardyce said of football management
Malky Mackay became the sixth Premier League managerial casualty of the season and the 13th departure of the calendar year
Andre Villas-Boas and Steve Clarke became the latest casualties of a ubiquitous perversion of Christmas cheer this weekend... But for both men, it is a case of 'goodbye but not farewell'. So clique-infested is the managerial merry-go-round that they will be back before you know it.
I'm not saying derby day victories are necessarily bigger than winning trophies, of course they aren't, but when clubs are unlikely to lift said trophies, then the derby triumph is the next best thing.
Of all the players Paolo Di Canio decided to make an example of, Cattermole was the most inexplicable. Of all the poor decisions he made, this was the worst. Of all the dissenting voices in the dressing room, the midfielder's was one of the most listened to.
Gus Poyet says he needs to "convince" Sunderland players they can avoid relegation from the Barclays Premier League. Poyet
Let's face it. It was no surprise to see Paolo Di Canio given his marching orders on Sunday. In just six short months, he had managed to upset and alienate everyone at Sunderland from the fans to the board, and probably even the tea lady.
When Sunderland parted company with Paolo Di Canio on Sunday, many cited the Italian's style of management for his dismissal - falling out with big characters in the dressing room as well as publicly denouncing his players... a filthy cloud lurks above Sunderland as a club and how they are run above management level.