Paris COP21

Right now, we all have an opportunity to win - to leave a safe, sustainable climate for our children and future generations, to establish a more equitable and secure society and to create a mutually prosperous economic future. If we do it right and right now, we may not be too late.
A Paris deal would be the final piece in the post-2015 global sustainability framework jigsaw. Such an agreement would also bolster the prospects of a carbon system emerging, from Asia-Pacific to the Americas, with potential to become a game-changing development in the fight against global warming.
Fighting against the fossil fuel industry is something campaigner Jeremy Leggett has been doing for many years with his work in social enterprise, charity, business, lobbying, and activism at Greenpeace...
Carbon-sink building materials, bike helmets which ionise particulate matter, monitoring PM2.5 levels at building sites and major traffic junctions. All seeming technologies of the future but all offering potential solutions to London's worsening air problem. It's time we have that conversation, before it's too late.
It feels like the dust has only just settled on September's UN General Assembly and the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Here we are though in the midst of the UNFCCC's annual climate circus, its' Conference of the Parties (COP).
There is significant potential from improving buildings. While we have seen good progress on making larger construction projects more sustainable, experts estimate that only 5% of smaller construction projects are designed for high performance.
Is that? Is that really? It is. It's an ostrich. A flat light fighting through the drizzle at the top of a one kilometre
Photo credit: Mark Robinson When Xi Jinping's treasure ship recently hove into view amidst a roar of diplomatic hubbub, David
It's December and I feel a blog coming on what with Advent commencing, and the advent of war just around the corner (for
Imagine you needed to solve the greatest problem facing humanity; a problem that was universally acknowledged and whose solution was an urgent necessity. Most of us would do anything to save a person we love. Surely we would also spend any amount of money, mortgage our futures even, to save the planet, our life-support system, from catastrophic climate change? But with such commitment and devotion comes vulnerability. This is particularly so when it comes to the issue of climate finance.
It is time for leaders to act now and meaningfully to reduce the extent and pace of climate change. Without urgent climate action wars, famines, floods, death and inequity are likely to result. We must remind them of education's critical role in opening up a myriad of human and environmental opportunities to thwart the devastating impacts of climate change.
I can only urge you to think of your grandchildren, as I think of mine, and of those billions of people without a voice; those for whom hope is the rarest of sensations; those for whom a secure life is a distant prospect. Most of all, I urge you to consider the needs of the youngest generation, because none of us has the right to assume that "for our today they should give up their tomorrow." On an increasingly crowded planet, humanity faces many threats - but none is greater than climate change.
The road to the Paris climate talks has been paved across decades. And as leaders convene in the capital today, they'd do well to look to those campaigners - past and present - whose resolve, courage and vision has roused the world to reach this moment.
It is difficult to properly understand climate change. The scientific jargon, sheer scale and global nature of the crisis it represents can lead to confusion and incomprehension but, perhaps more than anything, it is hard to appreciate how tackling this fundamental challenge will change the way in which we lead our lives. More than this, how do we even begin to comprehend the consequences of climate change for our children and the generations that will come after them?
We - the one million silenced voices, the one million people who this December were planning to march on Paris to call for climate justice - have a request, to the world media. For once. For this last portion of 2015. For these two December weeks...
From November 30th - December 11th, delegates from around the world will gather in Paris at what is projected to be the most
Change is created by turning points. Whether through evolution or revolution, turning points in history have changed the way we think, move, communicate, live. We are at a turning point now. A decisive hour when a historical event occurs, when a decision must be made, when we have understood that the consequences of the past need us to intentionally and decisively redefine the future.
Policy inputs by SELCO Foundation Policy Team Photo Credit: SELCO Foundation On 1 October 2015, India announced its new climate
Climate activists don't call themselves climate activists, it's the rest of us that does. Because it feels safer, amidst that scary climate crisis, to place the ones that express their care in the most confronting and the most vulnerable way, in a box. Just like the world tries to deny the entire climate problem.
It's safe to say climate change is not on the Conservative Party conference agenda this year. If you showed up just 12 minutes late to Monday afternoon's main event, you would've missed energy secretary Amber Rudd entirely. And indeed, it seems quite a few people did.