Paul Weller

'No political or cultural figurehead has ever come up with the phrase "a British dream", so Mod appeals to me politically because it's the closest we've ever come to having an American Dream.' So says Richard Weight, author of Mod: A Very British Style.
Minchella learned the business the hard way - perhaps the best way - on the pub circuit, playing professionally for the first time in 1987, two years before the golden break with Ocean Colour Scene.
As The Beatles' 'Tomorrow Never Knows' fades out over the PA, the feedback groan of Barrie Cadogan's Gibson splits the air, a white umbilical guitar lead coiling obscenely into the amp. Five minutes into the gig and the band has put a grip on a crowd who twist with delight in the dark womb of the club.
They're propping up the bar at The Blue Posts on Berwick Street in Soho, a duo enmeshed in a knockabout conversation about the politics of music.
The shop at 2 Marshall Street in Soho is something of an Aladdin's Cave, the headless mannequins in the window the sharpest
Their Britpop rivalry was legendary, but Noel Gallagher and Damon Albarn have put their musical differences aside to perform
He's a strange brew, at once funny, then turning on a dime, as serious as a prophet. Born in Belfast in 1963, Michael Smiley grew up in a cultural atmosphere which fed his ire, and ultimately, his humour.
It has been 22 years since the release of the landmark album Road To Freedom. Jason Holmes speaks to Femi Williams (aka Femi Fem), one third of The Young Disciples, about how the record came into existence.
Bradley Wiggins is living up to his Mod image by recording with his hero Paul Weller on the new single by The Jam. The cyclist
A love of live music pervades the club, rather than the sweaty media ambition of the mainstream, whose godheads can be identified as the millionaire prefab boy bands who some of us have learned to avoid.
It's a chance to listen to the remarkable progression from 1977 to 1982 over six increasingly impressive albums.
Before the band departed, their fists raised, Weller barked "Thanks for coming for such a great cause on such a piss poor night! Give yourselves a round of applause!" So we did.
Mark Powell pushes back his hat and relaxes into his armchair, a pair of handsome new specs upon his nose. 'I'm still cutting edge, moving forward, and I've also got the back-up of a great history,' he tells me.
It's tough getting through the throng of women. It's Friday night and Sam Gray's set has just ended. Sweat is pearling on his brow. He bows and steps from the stage. The four other band members lay down their instruments and grin at each other.
Fresh back from a short tour of the US and Japan, Paul Weller talks about the 30th anniversary of The Jam's sixth and final studio album, The Gift, and where he's at right now.
Though identifiable as a music writer, Paolo is also very much a social historian. 'The thing about the internet these days, and home recording, is that music has become so much more accessible, but to be honest with you, I can't keep up with it all.'
Mod rocker Paul Weller has joined forces with British cycling hero Bradley Wiggins to record a new radio special. Wiggins
Running until 26 October at the famed London venue, the Dean Chalkley: Look Hear and Young Souls exhibition is a breath of much-needed fresh air for photography in the capital. Jason Holmes ventured west to meet the man
Outside 108 Commercial Street, the scooters nose in like a shoal of robot fish. I make my way through the crowd. The sun has set and the towers around Liverpool Street loom over the roof of Spitalfields market. The guy on the door ticks my name off the list and I walk in and get handed a drink.
Mark is your classic Londoner; loyal to his manor, but equally at home in cosmopolitan Soho and in touch with different cultural spheres.