pay

By offering this opportunity of tax free part time work to the existing labour market, the income generated would help to resolve many of the problems with pay disputes. It would also help the economy to recover without impacting the existing taxation intake, which is necessary to maintain due to the staggering national debt requiring repayment.
This is a very odd election. Conservatives talking about building, rather than selling, council homes. Tony Blair and Jeremy Corbyn sharing a campaign slogan. Stepping back from the campaign itself, even the existence of the election is an odd bit of political economy for one big reason: a British Prime Minister has chosen to go to the polls at a time when voters are seeing their wages fall.
Since the Government announced the withdrawal of student funding for would-be nurses last year, we are already hearing of a 20% drop in applications for graduate nursing courses. And the 1% pay cap on salaries is not helping to encourage people into nursing and is making existing nurses reconsider whether they can even afford to continue. If the NHS wants to achieve a clean bill of health, we need to ensure there is adequate staffing, funding, resource and education. The health of the nation is at stake.
New gender pay gap reporting requirements will at least require large employers to take the first step and publish their gender pay gap. But until we tackle each of the causes the pay gap will be with us for generations to come. Millennial women will be old hands at it by then it seem.
t surely is possible to close the pay gap within a generation, but it means making fundamental changes. We have to reassess how we view the relative contribution of men and women, both in sports and in work. That means asking ourselves some difficult questions, stating with: what are we willing to do about it?
In the hours following the announcement that Theresa May would become prime minister without a vote being put to the membership
I've been thinking a lot about teaching assistants this week. As my Twitter followers might know, I've been tweeting about the Durham TAs and following the striking Derby TAs and generally, reflecting upon how badly we treat our school support staff. As a former teaching assistant myself, they have my total support.
Young people earned some £6,700 less than the national average last year, while women were paid marginally more than men
If you are giving someone a lower rate of pay because of their gender, that is wrong. Djokovic may say it's based on popularity of players, but it's gender he is using as the dividing line, not gate receipts.