pay

I've been thinking a lot about teaching assistants this week. As my Twitter followers might know, I've been tweeting about the Durham TAs and following the striking Derby TAs and generally, reflecting upon how badly we treat our school support staff. As a former teaching assistant myself, they have my total support.
Young people earned some £6,700 less than the national average last year, while women were paid marginally more than men
If you are giving someone a lower rate of pay because of their gender, that is wrong. Djokovic may say it's based on popularity of players, but it's gender he is using as the dividing line, not gate receipts.
The objection to the junior doctor pay deal on offer is not childish petulance, avariciousness or political gaming. Nor is it an attempt to align junior doctor remuneration with financial sector packages. But it IS about money and being paid a fair wage for a demanding job.
A new survey by the NASUWT has found that more than half of teachers (57%) across England have not received or had confirmed that they will receive their 1% pay award this year. The survey, which attracted almost 7,000 responses from our members, revealed disturbing results showing that of those eligible for pay progression, 47% had either been refused or had not had a decision made by their school.
A teenager who worked for 10 weeks in a local corner shop so he could save money to buy Christmas presents for his family
Deny it all you want, but at some point in your life you've been forced to clear your browsing history because of some questionable content you found yourself viewing at nearly midnight on a Friday after a stressful week. Sometimes the temptation is just too much to avoid surfing to the wrong side of the tracks and what follows is a swift re-writing of history where we pretend that we were on the phone or had dropped off for a moment instead.
1.8 million more people are in work since 2010, and that works out at roughly 1,000 per day. It is when you dig a bit deeper that things start to unravel. Only from the middle of 2013 were more employee jobs created than lost. Of the 1.1 million rise in the number in work between 2008 and 2014, 732,000 were actually in self-employment.
David Cameron and George Osborne have been lifted by a series of economic figures that experts described as "nothing but